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April 24, 2014  |  About the Berkley Center  |  Directions to the Center  |  Subscribe
 
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Religion in the Tunisian Constitution

The previous Tunisian constitution provided for freedom of religion, but stipulated that Tunisia was an Islamic state and that the president must be a Muslim. In 2007, a Tunisian court found a law that restricts the wearing of the hijab to be unconstitutional on the grounds that it restricts the free practice of religion. However, the ruling was nonbinding and rejected by the government of President Ben Ali. As of April 2012, a drafting committee is working to construct a post-revolution constitution for Tunisia. The ruling Islamist party, Ennahda, has said that, although it supports the designation of Islam as the official state religion, it will not seek to include Sharia law as a source of legislation in the new constitution.