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Economicjusticeforall

December 6, 2011

The Bishops' Letter "Economic Justice For All": Twenty-Five Years Later

In November 1986, in the midst of an economic expansion, the Bishops of the United States published a pastoral letter on Catholic Social Teaching and its policy implications. They gave it the title “Economic Justice for All.” A quarter century later, the economy is stagnating, the Tea Party and Occupy Wall St. have emerged, and we are in the midst of a prolonged budget crisis.

- How well do the Bishops' analysis and prescriptions hold up after 25 years?
- How relevant is Catholic Social Teaching to today's economic and budget crisis?
- Does the current political deadlock on the budget reflect different views of economic justice?

The Berkley Center and the Governance Studies Program at Brookings convened a roundtable of four experts to address these questions: E.J. Dionne (Brookings Institution and Georgetown), Ross Douthat (New York Times), Christine Firer Hinze (Fordham) and Rev. Robert Sirico (Acton Institute). Center Director Tom Banchoff moderated.

This event was made possible through the generosity of the Ford Foundation and co-sponsored by the Woodstock Theological Center.

Participants

Thomas Banchoff

Thomas Banchoff

Thomas Banchoff is Vice President for Global Engagement at Georgetown University. He also serves as founding director of the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs, and as Professor in the Department of Government and the School of...
E.J. Dionne, Jr.

E.J. Dionne, Jr.

E.J. Dionne is a senior research fellow at the Berkley Center, University Professor in the Foundations of Democracy and Culture at Georgetown University, and a leading scholar and commentator on religion in US politics. A senior fellow in the...
Ross Douthat

Ross Douthat

Ross Douthat has been an op-ed columnist with the New York Times since April 2009. Previously, he was a senior editor at the Atlantic and a blogger for theatlantic.com. He is the author of Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics (2012)...
Christine Firer Hinze

Christine Firer Hinze

Christine Firer Hinze is a professor of Christian Ethics at Fordham University and the director of the Francis and Ann Curran Center for American Catholic Studies. A theologian whose research emphasizes Christian ethics, Catholic social thought,...
Robert Sirico

Robert Sirico

Rev. Roberto Sirico is a Roman Catholic priest and the co-founder and president of the Acton Institute, an organization for the study of religion and liberty that seeks to integrate "Judeo-Christian truths with free market principles." Fr. Sirico...