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April 18, 2014  |  About the Berkley Center  |  Directions to the Center  |  Subscribe
 
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TRADITION

TOPICS

Hinduism Hinduism
Hinduism is an Indian religion encompassing diverse ritualistic Vedic traditions stressing the importance of karma and societal norms. The vast field of Hindu scriptures...

Moksha
解脱

Moksha is the liberation from the cycle of death and rebirth known as samsara. As such, moksha is the ultimate goal of Hindu religious practice. The believer achieves moksha through self-realization. According to the Advaita (non-dual) school of Hindu thought, this self-realization comes through the recognition that one’s atman (self) is one and the same as Brahman—the pure, absolute reality comprising the entire universe. In the Dvaita (dualistic) school of thought, true self-realization comes through attaining a loving union with the Supreme Being, often manifested in the form of a god such as Vishnu, while maintaining one’s own existential uniqueness. Advaita Hindus emphasize meditation and thoughtful action in achieving moksha, while Dvaita Hindus emphasize loving worship and devotion to a deity.
解脱是从被称为“轮回”的死亡和重生的循环中解放出来。因此,解脱是印度教宗教实践的终极目标。信徒通过“自觉”获得解脱。印度教的“阿德瓦塔”派(“不二论”)认为,这种“自觉”来自于认识到个人的“阿特曼”(自我)与“梵”同一无二——“梵”是包括了整个宇宙, 纯净、绝对的现实。在“德瓦伊塔”(“二元论”)派看来,真正的“自觉”是通过实现一个充满爱心联盟与最高法院的存在,往往表现为一个神毗湿奴等形式,同时维持自己存在的独特性。不二的印度教徒强调冥想和周到的行动实现解脱,而Dvaita印度教徒强调爱的神的崇拜和奉献精神。