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July 29, 2014  |  About the Berkley Center  |  Directions to the Center  |  Subscribe
 
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Interreligious Dialogue Interreligious Dialogue
Interfaith dialogue describes exchanges among religious practitioners and communities on matters of doctrine and issues of mutual concern in culture and politics. Explore...

RELATED RESOURCES: MUSLIM

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《中国穆斯林》

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Acommonword

A Common Word Between Us and You: A Global Agenda for Change

October 6, 2009
Georgetown University's Office of the President and Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding, together with the Royal Aal al-Bayt Institute for Islamic Thought, hosted "A Common Word Between Us and You: A Global Agenda for Change" at Georgetown University. This two-day conference focused on the importance of Muslim-Western cooperation on global issues and developed concrete proposals to achieve peace and understanding between these two communities. Unlike most Common Word events, the Georgetown conference included not only religious leaders and scholars but also political leaders, community representatives, and media. With previous conferences having solidified the theoretical basis for the Common Word project, the Georgetown conference broadened the scope of the discussion to apply the spirit of dialogue to issues of global political, social, and economic significance. Topics included the role of international NGOs in spurring Muslim-Christian interaction and how religious leaders could better facilitate conflict resolution.