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April 20, 2014  |  About the Berkley Center  |  Directions to the Center  |  Subscribe
 
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COUNTRY

Iraq Iraq

TRADITION

TOPICS

Iraq
Over its long history, Iraq has been both a center of cosmopolitan civilization and a site of sectarian conflict. Baghdad was the intellectual capital of the Muslim world...

Islamicsupremecouncilofiraq

Islamic Supreme Council of Iraq

Formerly known as the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq, the Islamic Supreme Council of Iraq (ISCI) is one of Iraq’s largest political parties. Supported by members of the country’s Shi’a community, the Iranian government sponsored the party’s creation in 1982 during the Iran-Iraq war after the leading Iraqi Islamist group was weakened by a government crackdown. Designed as an umbrella organization that would unite various Iraqi Shi’a groups, the party supports Islamic government controlled by ulema. ISCI plays a leading role in post-Saddam Iraq, working closely with other Shi’a organizations to provide social services and humanitarian aid. The group has been accused of receiving money and weapons from Iran, but leaders maintain that the party is committed to democracy and peaceful cooperation. ISCI’s party base lies in the Shi’a-majority southern Iraq. It also has an armed wing, the Badr Organization, with an estimated strength of 4,000-10,000 men.