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July 22, 2014  |  About the Berkley Center  |  Directions to the Center  |  Subscribe
 
Topics Traditions Countries Classroom US/China  

COUNTRY

Germany Germany

TOPICS

Interreligious Dialogue Interreligious Dialogue
Interfaith dialogue describes exchanges among religious practitioners and communities on matters of doctrine and issues of mutual concern in culture and politics. Explore...
Germany
While German society has become increasingly secular, the country remains home to a thoroughly organized religious sector, with the Roman Catholic and Lutheran churches as...

RELATED RESOURCES: ECUMENICAL

Ecumenical Women
Organization
Ronald Reagan on Politics and Morality at Ecumenical Prayer Breakfast
罗纳德∙里根在世界祈祷早餐会上论政治与道德

Quote

Theological Declaration of Barmen

May 31, 0001
The 1934 Theological Declaration of Barmen emerged out of an effort by the German confessing churches to mount ecumenical opposition to the totalizing claims of Nazism, and the Declaration is now considered an important step forward in the history of the European ecumenical movement. The Theological Declaration of Barmen begins by assuring readers that they wholeheartedly support the unity of the German Evangelical Church and the German nation, but only when God and scripture are the foundation, and they therefore condemn the efforts of the "German Christians" (Nazi supporters) to identify another basis for unity. The Declaration then lists a series of "evangelical truths" paired with the competing false doctrine. These sets address beliefs about sources of revelation, the total lordship of Jesus Christ, leadership in the church, and the relationship between the church and the state. The Declaration closes with a call to embrace "the unity of faith, love, and hope."