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Interreligious Dialogue Interreligious Dialogue
Interfaith dialogue describes exchanges among religious practitioners and communities on matters of doctrine and issues of mutual concern in culture and politics. Explore...
Religion and Development Database Religion and Development Database
An increasing number of organizations and programs are grappling with problems at the intersection of religion and development. On this site you have access to the latest...

RELATED RESOURCES: INTERFAITH

Interfaith Alliance
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Charta Oecumenica
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081129interfaithclimatesummit

Uppsala Manifesto: Hope for the Future

November 29, 2008
Signed at the Interfaith Climate Summit in Uppsala, Sweden, the Uppsala Manifesto draws on the principles of the world's faith traditions in a powerful call to address climate change and promote environmental stewardship. It begins by admitting that humans are affecting the world's climate in unprecedented ways, and the necessary solutions will be equally far-reaching. Religions provide a unique source of hope and ethical guidance as leaders develop global strategies and affix responsibility for implementation. In order to keep climate change below 2 degree Celsius, the manifesto asks political leaders to support binding emissions cuts in rich countries, clean development economic incentives and mitigation programs for developing countries, and free global exchange of clean technology. The signatories then pledge to use their influence to help change harmful behaviors and patterns of consumption. The manifesto closes by framing climate change as an issue of justice, peace, and solidarity.