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Religionandglobaldevelopment

Religion and Development Database

Publications (181)

An increasing number of organizations and programs are grappling with problems at the intersection of religion and development. On this site you have access to the latest world news on the topic and can explore faith-related efforts across countries, regions, and issue areas. The Religion and Global Development Resources are supported by the Luce/SFS Program on Religion and International Affairs.


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  • April 1, 2013
    In this report the President's Advisory Council on Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships identifies modern-day slavery as a vital moral issue, advocating urgent and collaborative action from the US government. The report lays out ten recommendations for President Barack Obama, including a summit to raise awareness, a "National Call to Action" on the issue, improved strategies for embassies and USAID Missions, and an informational "toolkit" for religious and community-based organizations....
  • August 1, 2012
    The United States Institute of Peace's "Special Report on Religion and Peacebuilding" notes the growing recognition of religious institutions’ role in conflict resolution and government partnerships. The report tracks the history of religious peacebuilding and identifies challenges in the present and future such as integration with secular initiatives, the inclusion of women and youth, diversity of traditions, and evaluation. The publication also traces the institutional history of USIP's...
  • January 1, 2012
    Faith Partnership Principles: Working Effectively With Faith Groups to Fight Global Poverty was composed by the United Kingdom's Department for International Development (DFID) in collaboration with UK Aid to outline a transparent and collaborative relationship between DFID and faith actors in development. The document establishes a commitment to building a mutual understanding of religion and development; documenting, researching, and evaluating the influence of faith groups; and...
  • January 1, 2012
    UNICEF's report on“Partnering with Religious Communities for Children” intends to bolster partnerships with religious communities and make them more effective to improve children’s lives. This report provides information about religious traditions and identifies the diverse perspectives that exist within and outside the same traditions. The report includes examples of effective partnerships and best practices across a broad range of program areas such as child protection, education, health,...
  • October 18, 2011
    This publication reports findings from interviews with the African Christian Health Associations (CHAs) in Zimbabwe, Kenya, Malawi, Sudan, Nigeria, Zambia, Chad, and Tanzania about family planning and reproductive health. Christian Health Associations provide about thirty to fifty percent of health services in most African countries, and many are the sole providers in rural areas. The report concludes that many African FBOs, CHAs particularly, acknowledge family planning and reproductive...
  • September 1, 2011
    This joint report by six development organizations, including Tearfund and Action Against Hunger, explores the challenges and benefits of integrated approaches to combatting development issues like healthcare, clean water and sanitation, and nutrition, in countries throughout Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Through several case studies, "Join Up, Scale Up: How Integration Can Defeat Disease and Poverty" offers realistic, cost-effective solutions for meeting the Millenium Development Goals as...
  • January 1, 2011
    Sponsored by DFID's Religions and Development Research Programme at the University of Birmingham, this research comparatively analyzes the extent to which religious actors help or hinder development in India, Pakistan, Nigeria, and Tanzania. The report draws conclusions on the ways different types of government coexist with different types of religious demography, as well as how religious groups contribute to democratic governance. Individual case studies reference historical trends in order...
  • January 1, 2011
    This publication reports on and evaluates the “Mosques in Communities” Project, which aimed to develop capacity within British mosques in matters of governance. The report provides analyses and commentary on the role of mosques in the context of societal needs and identifies possible areas where the mosques’ wider engagement needs to be supported; it also outlines issues and challenges for mosques to partner with local communities, councils, and other governing bodies to address issues...
  • December 20, 2010
    This edition of the IDS Bulletin, published by the Institute of Development Studies, discusses what the intersection of global, local, and national politics with religion and gender means for policy and practice. The report is based on discussions from a workshop that brought together scholars, social activists, and religious leaders to address the challenges and opportunities in the realm of religion and gender. The report has a special focus on the Muslim world as it responds to the themes...
  • November 1, 2010
    Any effort to understand and improve the nexus between religion and economic development will entail a "top-down" dimension (focusing on government policy) and a "bottom-up" dimension (focusing on the perspectives and behaviors of religious actors themselves). This special issue of The Review of Faith & International Affairs (Winter 2010) brings top-down and bottom-up together in a common forum. It features an article by Katherine Marshall on “Development, Religion, and Women’s Roles in...
  • April 26, 2010
    In this article from the Review of Faith & International Affairs, Robert Lloyd details former president George W. Bush’s move to ensure equal access to government funding for faith-based organizations engaged in development work. The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is the principle federal institution for foreign aid, and prior to Bush’s presidency, faith-based organizations were often excluded from USAID funding. Lloyd describes the process of amending USAID...
  • March 30, 2010
    "The Role of Faith Based Organizations in Good Governance" is a report of the outcomes of the three-day Interfaith Dialogue convention in Tanzania in November 2009, which focused on practical ways faith-based organizations can contribute to political education and building competence among Tanzanian citizens in addition to promoting civic leadership based on local values, ethos, and culture. Since Tanzania is experiencing religious intolerance due to social stratification, the report...
  • January 1, 2010
    Commissioned by Tearfund, this report explores how local faith-based responses to HIV strengthen health systems in Africa. Using desk review, semi-structured interviews, and focus group discussions with personnel and stakeholders from Christian development organizations in Malawi and Chad, researchers found that not only can FBOs educate and influence a wide swath of hard-to-reach populations, interfaith efforts can also cut across traditional barriers to deliver HIV services to all. FBOs'...
  • January 1, 2010
    This Harvard University Center for International Development working paper discusses the impact of religious beliefs on personal finance decisions, specifically the higher deposit growth rates in Islamic banks in Pakistan. The paper explores the positive effect of the financial crisis on religious banks despite lower credit scores and the complex, interconnected factors influencing personal finance decisions for a religiously-motivated population. Sections of the paper include background on...
  • December 1, 2009
    The report "Partnership with Faith-Based Organizations: UNAIDS Strategic Framework" draws on an 18-month consultation process to detail a new framework for cooperative interaction between UNAIDS and FBOs in support of the global goal of universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care, and support. The report begins by clarifying the terms of discussion and highlighting the crucial role FBOs play in providing HIV-related health services. It acknowledges mistrust of the other on both sides...
  • July 1, 2009
    Partnering with Christian Aid, Islamic Relief, and World Jewish Relief, the Woolf Institute of Abrahamic Faiths published this report to examine the contributions to development made by faith-based organizations, especially when working across religious divides, and to address challenges and recommendations for the future of effective interfaith development collaboration. "Keeping the Faith in Development: The Significance of Interfaith Relations in the Work of Humanitarian Aid and...
  • June 28, 2009
    Caritas in Veritate is an encyclical by Pope Benedict XVI that addresses the relationship between charity and truth as the foundation of the Church's social doctrine. Benedict XVI praises the work of Pope Paul VI in Populorum Progressio and commits to reinterpreting the principles of integral human development for contemporary times. After reviewing the writings of Paul VI, he uses the then-current financial crisis to evaluate the global economic system and present-day conceptions of...
  • March 1, 2009
    Bridging the Gaps: Faith-based Organizations, Neoliberalism, and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean examines the particular role of faith-based agencies in Latin America. Essays from experienced contributors, grounded in empirical case studies, explore topics like the meaning of "faith-based" development, the influence of faith orientation on program efficiency and format, and the difference between faith-based and secular development approaches, all set in the context of the...
  • January 1, 2009
    "Emerging Evidence on Vouchers and Faith-Based Providers in Education," a World Bank publication, provides case studies of various types of schools that benefit from public-private partnerships in Africa, Latin America, and Asia. The empirical study focuses on the effectiveness of voucher programs and faith-based schools. The study finds mixed results: for instance, that some voucher schools outperform public schools but at small margins. The evidence on faith-based schools was mixed as well....
  • November 29, 2008
    Signed at the Interfaith Climate Summit in Uppsala, Sweden, the Uppsala Manifesto draws on the principles of the world's faith traditions in a powerful call to address climate change and promote environmental stewardship. It begins by admitting that humans are affecting the world's climate in unprecedented ways, and the necessary solutions will be equally far-reaching. Religions provide a unique source of hope and ethical guidance as leaders develop global strategies and affix responsibility...
  • August 1, 2008
    This report by the United Nations Population Fund documents the nature and impact of its partnerships with faith-based organizations in the Asia-Pacific region stemming from the International Conference on Populations and Development (ICPD). It focuses on shared initiatives on issues of maternal health, gender equality, migration, and youth welfare, and it documents the best practices of these strategic alliances throughout Asia. The publication contains summaries and information about the...
  • January 1, 2008
    Edited by Gerard Clarke and Michael Jennings, Development, Civil Society and Faith-Based Organizations promotes greater consideration of the contributions of faith-based organizations in development. Focusing on Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, it touches on the intersection of religion and international aid, welfare services, gender, human rights, and democracy. It critiques the secularism integrated in traditional development theory and initiatives in the North and argues for the...
  • January 1, 2008
    The advocacy guide Faith at the UN, Gender in the Church: Ecumenical Women's Guide to Advocacy focuses on participation in the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, though it also includes advice for local and national efforts. Divided into four sections, the guide begins with a history of the sponsoring organization, Ecumenical Women. The following two sections then address advocacy strategies at the United Nations and within local churches and communities. The final section...
  • December 1, 2007
    The December 2007 edition of the Capacity Project’s Voices report, funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), focuses on the role of faith-based organizations in the sustainability of health services in Africa. "A Key Piece of the Puzzle: Faith-Based Health Services in Sub-Saharan Africa" highlights the significant contributions of FBOs in health services provision through hospitals, clinics, and community- and home-based programs. Moreover, the report's...
  • September 3, 2007
    Based on field research by Donald Miller and Tetsunao Yamamori, this book and accompanying DVD examine the shift of Christianity’s center of gravity to the developing world. It contains extensive research on the role of Christianity, particularly Pentecostalism, in twenty different countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Europe. The book and DVD provide a wide-ranging portrait of a new social movement developing in Pentecostalism. The book explores themes such as social activism, social...
  • August 16, 2007
    The UNDP HIV/AIDS Regional Programme in the Arab States (HARPAS) outlines objectives and methods for its Religious Leaders & HIV/AIDS Initiative, a program to enroll and mobilize religious leaders and promote interfaith dialogue in the fight against HIV/AIDS in the Arab region. It asserts that dialogue at its core is not found in theological debates or compliments, but rather in solidarity and commitment in the face of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Since 2004, HARPAS has hosted seven regional and...
  • August 16, 2007
    In this paper, the World Wildlife Foundation defines the concept of "Sacred Gifts for a Living Planet," promises from every major religion and every continent to advance the conservation goals of the World Wildlife Fund (WWF). A Sacred Gift addresses a specific environmental problem or need and promotes sustainable responses from faith communities. The Journey to Kathmandu Initiative seeks to spotlight the WWF, its conservation goals and outreach to major faiths, and the successes...
  • August 16, 2007
    This is a pamphlet from the All African Anglican Conference on HIV/AIDS featuring hymns and prayers from the closing religious ceremonies. The final Eucharist of the conference took place on Thursday, August 16, 2007, with a theme of "United In Jesus We Embrace All Who Live With HIV/AIDS in Africa." The pamphlet includes the liturgy for use during the procession, reflection and lighting of the HIV/AIDS candle, penitence, readings from Luke 10:25-37, and communion.
  • August 14, 2007
    This paper, prepared by the Chinese Taoist Association in Beijing, outlines the theological basis for Taoist interest in development, as well as a vision for equality. It discusses the economic and social teachings of the Taoist tradition born of principles such as virtue, balance, and restraint from desire. Taoism originated nearly 2,000 years ago in China and, as such, is integrated into modern Chinese culture. As the only indigenous religion represented in the five most prominent faiths in...
  • August 13, 2007
    This document discusses the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA)'s efforts to integrate religion and faith-based organizations into its Program of Action for Population and Development. "Cooperative Efforts between Faith Groups and the United Nations Population Fund" lays out reasons why religious groups are crucial partners for its initiatives; the report highlights the shared values systems of religious organizations and the UNFPA and the continued cultural and political power that...
  • August 13, 2007
    This article chronicles the first serious discussion between religious leaders and World Bank representatives regarding development funding. It outlines the historical and practical importance of the World Faiths Development Dialogue conference and the opportunities and challenges that grew out of it. The meeting resulted in the creation of the Alliance of Religions and Conservation and a promise from World Bank representative Andrew Steer to actively explore ways for the Bank to work more...
  • July 1, 2007
    Prepared for the UK Consortium on AIDS and International Development and distributed by the Tearfund International Learning Zone, this report examines the extent to which the UK Department for International Development (DFID) has fulfilled the commitment to working with faith-based organizations (FBOs) that it made in its 2004 Taking Action statement. "DFID, Faith and AIDS: A Review for the Update of Taking Action" highlights the unique contributions to HIV/AIDS response made by FBOs and...
  • February 1, 2007
    "Appreciating Assets: The Contribution of Religion to Universal Access in Africa" reports on the importance of partnerships with faith-based organizations in sub-Saharan Africa. It focuses on data collected from Zambia and Lesotho on the prevalence and community perception of FBOs working with HIV/AIDS patients. It ultimately offers advice to public health and religious leaders in their fight against HIV/AIDS. The report was produced by the African Religious Health Assets Program (ARHAP)...
  • January 1, 2007
    Published as part of the University of Birmingham's Religions and Development Research Programme Consortium, this paper examines the relationship between African traditional religious practices and beliefs and the concepts of development in modern times. Author Namawu Alhassan Alolo begins by addressing the historical approaches that have been taken to studying African traditional religions (ATR) and by offering an assessment of the variety of ATR beliefs. "African Traditional Religion and...
  • November 7, 2006
    The Joint Declaration of the International Catholic-Jewish Liaison Committee summarizes the committee's nineteenth meeting in Cape Town, South Africa, which used the theme "Dignifying the Divine Image" to explore beliefs about healthcare and the HIV/AIDS pandemic. It first highlights the fortieth anniversary of Nostra Aetate and celebrates the progress in dialogue made in the years since that time. Focusing on those affected by HIV/AIDS, the declaration admits continuing disagreement over...
  • July 31, 2006
    Sponsored by Tearfund, this briefing paper outlines the potential opportunities and challenges for collaboration between traditional international development agencies (IDAs) and Christian churches in Africa, especially in AIDS prevention, education, and treatment work. Tearfund emphasizes that FBOs are not just a subset of NGOs, but rather that their faith character gives them unique qualities. Community-based FBOs often feel that this uniqueness, along with their long-term commitment to the...
  • July 19, 2006
    In this address delivered at the 2006 Interfaith Summit on Africa, Church of God in Christ Bishop Charles E. Blake, Sr., discusses faith-based solutions to social justice issues in Africa, namely poverty and HIV/AIDS. In 2001, he co-founded the Pan African Children's Fund, also called Save Africa's Children (PACF/SAC), to assist faith-based institutions in serving orphans in sub-Saharan Africa. Supported by the United Nations Children's Fund and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS,...
  • July 1, 2006
    In this report the Firelight Foundation, a support organization for HIV-positive children in Sub-Saharan Africa, provides information on faith-based programs and strategies to assist children and families affected by HIV/AIDS in the region and advocates greater funding for family- and community-based programs. The report has been supported and endorsed by UNICEF, American Jewish World Service, the Bernard van Leer Foundation, Save Africa's Children/Pan African Children's Fund, Better Care...
  • June 1, 2006
    The Faiths and the Environment report amalgamates information about the many projects and groups involved in the Faiths and Environment program. The World Bank launched the program in 2000 to encourage the ecological protection efforts of faith-based initiatives. In this report, the World Bank argues that religious groups are natural partners in environmental stewardship and calls for the facilitation of their involvement in conservation efforts, providing examples of projects promoting this...
  • March 31, 2006
    In an article published by the African Jesuit AIDS Network (AJAN), Michael Czerny, S.J., discusses the comparative benefits of anti-retroviral (ARV) drugs versus community education programs in fighting HIV/AIDS. He incorporates both African and Western perspectives and invokes supporting examples of Catholic Church-led programs. Czerny posits that while ARVs are an important component of the struggle against HIV/AIDS, overemphasis on this method of treatment risks drawing valuable attention...
  • March 31, 2006
    Michael Kelly, a Jesuit priest living in Zambia, suggests a more dynamic framework for approaching the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS. He argues that the continuation of the pandemic is rooted in oppressive human structures linking poverty, gender disparities, stigma, discrimination, and global socio-economic disparities. He criticizes two models of responding to the disease: the biomedical, pharmaceutical model and the behavioral model. He instead advocates an approach focusing on the...
  • March 25, 2006
    In the March 25, 2006 edition of The Lancet, Shereen El Feki details the slowly dawning awareness in the Middle East and North Africa that HIV/AIDS is a serious problem that requires a concerted response. El Feki describes some of the education, prevention, treatment, and stigma reduction initiatives being carried out throughout the region by Muslim and Christian leaders from across the Arab region. She also notes the diversity of attitudes and level of response from country to country,...
  • March 1, 2006
    Originally published in the Bulletin of the Jesuit Centre for Theological Reflection, this pamphlet brings together essays about AIDS in Zambia by Michael J. Kelly, SJ. "Faith and AIDS in Zambia" offers a holistic view of the epidemic, its causes and consequences, and a series of socio-economic and religious responses to its challenges. Father Kelly is a Jesuit priest, Zambian citizen, educator, researcher, and activist on HIV/AIDS. His work is based on his experiences living in Zambia for...
  • February 1, 2006
    This report describes the findings of a 2003 multi-country study conducted by the Ecumenical Pharmaceutical Network (EPN) and the World Health Organization of 16 EPN-member faith-based drug-supply organizations (DSOs) and their contribution to supplying medicines in 11 sub-Saharan African countries. Utilizing assessment questionnaires, the study focused on assessments of these organizations’ supply, storage, and distribution systems. The results affirm that faith-based DSOs are generally...
  • January 31, 2006
    The Religions and Development Research Programme is an international research partnership based at the University of Birmingham. Its purpose is to explore the relationship between religion and development. In this report, it summarizes the first six months of the organization's life and outlines a program for Phase 1, which lasted from April 2006 to August 2010. In addition, it describes the purpose and themes of its research program, opportunities for further improvement, its management...
  • January 10, 2006
    This World Bank PowerPoint presentation called "Faith and Human Development in Africa: Worlds Apart, Worlds in Tension, Common Paths" explores development challenges within the context of religion in Africa. The presentation begins by addressing the assumption that most major religions have a stake in alleviating poverty. It discusses the historical implications of faith and religion in Africa, the strengths and weaknesses of faith-based organizations (FBOs), and possible ideas and strategies...
  • January 1, 2006
    The fourth of a four-part Human Development Report series, the "Arab Human Development Report 2005: Towards the Rise of Women in the Arab World" focuses on the empowerment of women as a necessary and crucial part of development in the region. The report examines the conditions experienced by women in the Arab world, and it explores a broad range of challenges and opportunities for further improvement in their situation. Intended to be provocative and to stimulate debate, the opinions...
  • January 1, 2006
    Produced following the 2005 "Workshop on Religion, Politics, Conflict and Humanitarian Action," this publication includes a collection of essays on the roles of religious organizations in humanitarian action from the perspectives of different faith traditions. The participants/authors included experts from Christian, Islamic, Buddhist, and Hindu faith-based organizations. The issue of proselytism among religious groups is addressed, and it suggests that faith-based relief organizations need...
  • December 7, 2005
    In this document, Hilary Benn, then British Secretary of State for the Department for International Development (DFID), provides a general overview of the role of faith groups in development and peace movements, with a focus on Africa. He examines faith-based groups as components of civil society and sources of national and international coalitions. The report comes out of DFID's acknowledgment of the centrality of faith in initiatives involving the poor through empowerment, education, and...
  • December 3, 2005
    In a plenary session of partnerships at the December 2005 Abuja pre-International Conference on AIDS and STDs in Africa (ICASA), Katherine Marshall explores the partnership between faith-based organizations and the World Bank in development work and the fight against HIV/AIDS. This document reviews the multi-faceted roles of faith institutions in confronting the pandemic, looking at the framework for partnerships between faith institutions and development organizations. In reviewing the...
  • November 17, 2005
    In this publication, the World Bank explores the mutually reinforcing relationship between HIV/AIDS and conflict in Africa, calling for faith-based organizations to ensure HIV/AIDS relief and prevention are included in programs serving war-affected populations. It discusses the challenges of preventing mother-to-child transmission in refugee camps and the absence of prevention and counseling services for refugees and internally displaced people. The article argues that since faith-based...
  • October 25, 2005
    In this paper, Wendy Tyndale, a researcher at the World Faiths and Development Dialogue, discusses the current market system of economics, the global state of spirituality, and the development of global ethics. She uses her conclusions to advocate a new world order with less emphasis on competition and more emphasis on humanity. She recognizes a common future that can be achieved only through cooperation at the global level. This paper was addressed to the Islamic Millennium Forum and the...
  • July 15, 2005
    Co-authored by Carol Lancaster and Ann Van Dusen, Organizing U.S. Foreign Aid: Confronting the Challenges of the 21st Century argues that while U.S. foreign aid has increased in recent years, the way it is organized and delivered by the U.S. government has become increasingly fragmented and chaotic. The proliferation of federal agencies engaged in foreign aid has created serious disconnects and inefficiencies in the use of this important tool of U.S. foreign policy. Lancaster and Van Dusen...
  • July 1, 2005
    In this draft paper for Vanderbilt University's Center for the Study of Religion and Culture, Katherine Marshall explores the African religious landscape, discusses the implications of global changes in religion for Africa, and analyzes the role of religion in African development. "Africa: How and Why Is Faith Important and Relevant for Development?" fits into a wider effort by the World Bank to examine the links among religion, poverty, social service provision, and development. It...
  • June 1, 2005
    In this paper published by the National Bureau of Asian Research, Laura M. Kelley and Nicholas Eberstadt discuss the extent to which the HIV/AIDS pandemic has affected the Muslim world and describe the policy implications of these findings. The authors criticize governments' hesitation to accept the urgency of the crisis, which they attribute to their unwillingness to accept that behaviors associated with the spread of HIV/AIDS, including premarital sex and intravenous drug use, take place in...
  • June 1, 2005
    In this article from the International Review of the Red Cross, Anne-Marie Holenstein discusses the risks and potential of the participation of faith-based organizations in development work, noting that religion is often an impetus for sustainable development while also acknowledging the misuse and exploitation of religion. Holenstein asserts that the role of religious organizations in development has historically been ignored, and that the cooperation between these organizations and...
  • April 1, 2005
    "Development Cooperation, Religion and Conflict" is the first briefing paper of the Working Group on Development and Peace (FriEnt) by Wolfgang Kaiser and addresses questions about the relationship between religion, development, violence, and peace and that between faith communities and development organizations. To facilitate discussions on religion and international cooperation, this document addresses four main areas of concern: the cooperation potential of religious actors worldwide, the...
  • April 1, 2005
    This United States Agency for International Development (USAID) publication explores the aim, nature, and methodology of development ethics, including specific proposals for incorporating development ethics within USAID policy formation and practice. The document is divided into two parts. The first explores the origins, agreements, controversies, and agendas of development ethics. The second looks at the intersection of development ethics and USAID, including a "toolkit" of development...
  • March 1, 2005
    In this working paper, Anne-Marie Holenstein discusses the role of religion and spirituality in international development work. In 2002, the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation sponsored a conference which addressed the topic, “Religion and Spirituality - a taboo in development co-operation?”. The tempered response of the NGOs which attended the conference lead to the launch of a period of reflection and directed dialogue regarding the topic. This document is the result of these...
  • February 1, 2005
    This document summarizes the Fourth Meeting of World Faith and Development Leaders, held in Dublin, Ireland. Participants explored issues of poverty eradication, globalization, social justice and equity, as well as tangible ways in which faith and development organizations could better cooperate to address common concerns. The conference in Dublin concentrated on social tensions, marginalized communities, and security. The series of meetings began in London in 1998 and were inspired by...
  • January 31, 2005
    This article on "Faith, Equity and Development" by Vibha Pinglé for the World Bank's Institute of Development Studies assesses how religious movements are influencing the development process of states. It explores the relations between faith, poverty, and development by examining specific religions and religious groups in a number of different countries, including Islam, Christianity, and Hinduism in Nigeria and Egypt, as well as the role of Islam in Indonesia. Pinglé comes to the conclusion...
  • January 31, 2005
    In this paper prepared as background for the 2005 meeting of faith and development leaders in Dublin, World Bank economist F. Desmond McCarthy reviews various structural and institutional changes in Ireland that have led to a more prosperous economy in the past half-century. He describes the importance of the Catholic Church in religious, political, and social arenas in the 1960s and the subsequent rise of secularism in the 1970s. This change, combined with integration with Europe, increase...
  • January 1, 2005
    In this report, the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) investigates the status of children living in the Islamic World. The report focuses on health, education, child protection, and HIV/AIDS. It is written within the context of larger Millennium Development Goals and a commitment to "A World Fit for Children." The report explores whether or not the global community is meeting its commitment to children in the Islamic World and also provides statistical tables and information on various...
  • November 30, 2004
    The Global Health Council analyzes the role and scope of faith-based organizations as part of the global response to HIV/AIDS through interviews with key decision makers in six countries. Commissioned by the Catholic Medical Mission Board, the study attempted to select countries representing a variety of regions, stages of the epidemic, and religious traditions. The report concludes that FBOs are successful in mitigating the negative effects of HIV/AIDS, empowering vulnerable groups, and...
  • November 30, 2004
    In this Bread For All pamphlet, Cristoph Stuckelberger outlines the impact of corruption on development work and discusses various methods to combat corruption. He believes corruption is the most salient issue for international political institutions, because it affects all countries, reduces the efficiency of development efforts, undermines justice, weakens democracy, makes the rich richer, and supports dictators. The pamphlet focuses on the ways in which governments and faith-based...
  • September 2, 2004
    Resurgent Voices in Latin America is a collection of essays that examine the relationship between changing religious dynamics and political activism in Latin America. The authors seek to provide insights in four areas: the interaction between traditional indigenous religions and Christianity to produce new forms of belief and practices; the ideological and motivational resources offered to indigenous groups by religious organizations; the political effectiveness of these religious groups; and...
  • August 31, 2004
    In this article, Scott M. Thomas of the University of Bath examines the limitations of modernization theories to explain the global resurgence of religion. He argues that previous methods used by policymakers to analyze failed or weak states no longer hold in a post-9/11 world. He explores the ways in which US foreign aid policy can benefit from cultural and religious pluralism, primarily by working with faith-based organizations to create religious centers that develop social capital.
  • August 6, 2004
    In this speech delivered at the Couchiching Conference, Katherine Marshall explores the relationship between religion and development, specifically as it relates to poverty alleviation. Her speech, entitled "The Emergence of a Faith and Development Dialogue and the Challenges of Fundamentalism and Terrorism for Development Institutions," concludes with an appreciation and an openness to the ways in which faith and development can intersect and enhance one another. The most important next step...
  • July 1, 2004
    In this essay written at the 60th Anniversary of the World Bank and published in Global Future, Lucy Keough of the Bank's Development Dialogue on Values and Ethics Unit reflects on the value of working with faith-based organizations in development efforts. She emphasizes the substantial overlap between the broad goals of the World Bank and faith communities. Pointing out instances of successful cooperation, she acknowledges that historically the relationship between them has often been marked...
  • May 31, 2004
    In this letter issued by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, prior to his election as Pope Benedict XVI, outlines the Catholic Church's contemporary perspective on the role of women in society. The principle of "active collaboration" rests on the notion of complementary equality, which acknowledges both the fundamental differences between men and women and their shared humanity. Ratzinger uses the concept of covenant to illustrate the parallels between...
  • May 25, 2004
    "Conquering Slim: Uganda's War on HIV/AIDS" explores the critical role of religious leaders and faith-based organizations in supporting Uganda's ABC (Abstinence, Be faithful, use a Condom) prevention strategy, education efforts, and anti-stigma initiatives, along with the challenges in sustaining this positive momentum in years to come. It also stresses how cooperation among diverse partners (including faith groups) and the integration of multiple initiatives was crucial to Uganda's success....
  • May 22, 2004
    Adopted by the League of Arab States in May 2004, the Arab Charter on Human Rights reiterates many of the principles outlined in the United Nations Charter, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam. As the charter is grounded in Islamic tenets, the preambulatory clauses stress the humanitarian values and principles espoused by Islam. The charter provides for the freedom of religious practice, right to peaceful assembly and association,...
  • April 23, 2004
    In an address given at the Princeton University Colloquium on Public and International Affairs, Katherine Marshall discusses the challenges facing various faith groups working to eradicate poverty. She describes (i) reasons behind the title of the address, "Mind, Soul and Hands: Challenges for Development/Faith Alliances in Fighting Poverty," (ii) her journey uniting the worlds of development and faith, (iii) her agenda for the week, and (iv) her current work on dialogue initiatives....
  • April 1, 2004
    In this report, USAID's Bureau for Policy and Program Coordination (PPC) examines the state of the educational systems of several countries in the Muslim world, reviewing the various educational programs supported by the agency. Through this three-month desk study, PPC analyzes the successes and shortcomings of twelve countries' systems, comparing methods used in secular systems to those used in Islamic systems. The report pays particular attention to the strengths and weaknesses of each...
  • March 30, 2004
    In this transcript of the third annual Richard W. Snowdon Lecture at Trinity College, Washington, DC, World Bank President James D. Wolfensohn addresses the Interfaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington (IFC) about the partnership between the World Bank and religious communities. Wolfensohn commends the IFC for its work but emphasizes the need for a global expansion of these efforts. He describes the initiative of the World Bank to incorporate religious and ethical considerations into...
  • February 18, 2004
    In this speech delivered at Claremont Graduate University, Katherine Marshall discusses the moral dilemmas that globalization brings and the ethical imperatives individuals should take upon themselves in this new millennium. She addresses questions which are central to development practitioners, and which have lingered in the field for some time, including how poverty and globalization are related and why poverty and severe inequality persist in a time of such plenty. Marshall also considers...
  • February 14, 2004
    In this paper, Abdul Aziz Said outlines the steps and values necessary to create "global citizens" who will prosper in an increasingly interconnected world. He believes global citizenship requires a fusion of tradition, technology, and development and will mitigate the growing gaps in access to knowledge, wealth, and political representation around the world. Said holds the Mohammed Said Farsi Chair of Islamic Peace and is the Director of the Center for Global Peace at American...
  • January 28, 2004
    This document outlines dialogue between the International Labour Organization and the World Council of Churches concerning the organizations' joint efforts to establish a "Decent Work Agenda" that would integrate the concepts of work and dignity. The two parties intent to explore spiritual dimensions of labor in addition to wages, workplace conditions, and social protections. Specifically, they seek to inject the idea of human dignity into conversations on the protection of workplace...
  • January 27, 2004
    This article was written in response to the tragic death of Li Siyi, a three-year-old girl who starved in June 2003 after police arrested her mother. Despite the mother's pleas, nothing was done to ensure the welfare of Siyi, who died seventeen days later. In September 2003, Ren Bumei, a Christian dissident intellectual coordinated a hunger strike in memory of Siyi. In this essay, Ren Bumei indicts the Chinese intellectual elite for enabling such tragedies.
  • January 27, 2004
    In the 2004 edition of China Rights Forum: The Call of the Sacred, Jennifer Chou writes in response to China's growing reputation as a society without humanity and morality. She attributes this attitude to extensive disillusionment with communism and increased emphasis on material wealth. Chou looks to radio talk shows as a source of renewed interest in reinstating China's moral compass. Her article includes the poem "Too Many Things Forgotten" by Zhang Zhen.
  • January 27, 2004
    This article in the 2004 edition of China Rights Forum: The Call of the Sacred describes the significance of and official attack on Falungong, a peaceful, religious movement in China. It outlines the movement's rapid expansion in the 1990s and reasons why the Chinese government chose to treat the movement as a threat. The article puts Falungong into a broader context of political repression in China, culminating in the resolution on heretical sects passed by the 12th session of the 9th...
  • January 1, 2004
    "Women of Faith Transforming Conflict: A Multi-Religious Training Manual" serves as a practical conflict-resolution training manual for women of faith, especially those living in the developing world. The document details conflict resolution training, including anger management strategies, signs of trauma and methods for recovery, and techniques for mobilizing the media. The methods discussed have been tested in the field by religious women on the front lines of violent conflict in West...
  • November 30, 2003
    In this report the United Nations Population Fund highlights its efforts to support culturally sensitive programs focused on gender equity and reproductive health. Case studies from country programs in Brazil, Ghana, Guatemala, India, Islamic Republic of Iran, Uganda, and Yemen describe a decade's worth of successes and challenges that come with partnerships with community- and faith-based organizations. It concludes by arguing that integrating cultural analysis and strengthening cooperation...
  • November 30, 2003
    The World Faiths Development Dialgoue contributed analysis to the 2004 World Development Report, an annual World Bank publication concerning the state of global development. This consultation submission discusses ways to address global poverty from a faith-based perspective. It points out that religion remains an important influence in the South even if it has decreased in significance in the North. The document acknowledges the difficulties for international organizations and national...
  • November 30, 2003
    In an article in the Carnegie Reporter, Caryle Murphy discusses the deep rifts between Western feminism and Islam and the ways to move beyond mutual misunderstanding to productive coexistence. The process is gradual and must involve women of secular and religious backgrounds. According to Murphy, dialogue for the sake of improving relations among Western and Muslim women has been rare; it is usually the byproduct of other programs and initiatives. Murphy outlines the work of feminist author...
  • November 14, 2003
    This book from the World Bank explores the ecological ideas found in 11 different religious traditions. It considers if and how environmental protection is consistent with these many traditions, as well as how their practices and institutions can contribute to conservation. It posits that religious communities are a significant force in international politics and economics, as well as the foundations of many cultures, so changing legislation, business practices, and cultural norms about the...
  • November 1, 2003
    This UNICEF document, a result of the June 2002 African Religious Leaders’ Assembly on Children and HIV/AIDS, was produced in partnership with the World Conference of Religions for Peace to advocate for the involvement of religious leaders and organizations in the fight to stop the spread of HIV/AIDS. Discussing tools and resources which community and faith-based leaders can utilize, it offers advice on how African and Asian communities can implement change. "What Religious Leaders Can Do...
  • October 1, 2003
    This occasional paper published by the Caux Round Table contains an introduction and three essays that discuss the common values of Abrahamic faiths and their application to business practices. In the introduction, John Dalla Costa writes about corporate integrity and religious standards for business. In section one, Paul Cardinal Poupard, President of the Pontifical Council for Culture, describes the role of religion in positively transforming business leadership. In section two, Dr. M.H....
  • August 31, 2003
    The fall 2003 edition of Mosaic, a publication of the World Conference of Religions for Peace Women's Program, focuses on the role of women in peacemaking and conflict transformation. The publication highlights the important position of religious women working on the front lines to restore peace. Articles discuss updates from the field, notably interfaith and conflict resolution initiatives in the Balkans, West Africa, Argentina, and Peru; training on women and conflict in Sierra Leone; and...
  • July 1, 2003
    This Tearfund research project addresses the recent increase in casualties and disruption of development projects due to natural disasters. It predicts further increases in vulnerability from population expansion, displacement, HIV/AIDS, environmental degradation and global warming. The report analyzes the lack of incentives for donors to invest in risk-reducing components of development schemes and makes recommendations to help create a preventive culture in which the economic and moral...
  • June 7, 2003
    In this report, Katherine Marshall summarizes the panels and speeches of the 2003 Fez Symposium, "Giving a Soul to Globalization." The symposium focuses on the transmission of culture and core values from one generation to the next and the current generation's responsibilities to future generations. Marshall identifies four key themes that mark our time: (i) world conflict among, but particularly within, nations, (ii) dramatic disparities between the rich and the poor, (iii) the...
  • January 6, 2003
    This World Peace Foundation (WPF) policy brief outlines the conclusions reached at a conference at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government concerning Nigeria's continuing governance problems. The conference was a part of WPF's Program on Intrastate Conflict and Conflict Resolution. The report focuses on nine critical governance problems in Nigeria: over-centralization, lack of transparency, lack of economic diversification, corruption, sharia law, human rights, an illegitimate...
  • January 1, 2003
    This Catholics for a Free Choice report affirms that the Platform for Action, a product of the United Nations' Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing in 1995, resonates with Catholic social teachings on economic justice and human rights. The report provides information for Catholics who are at risk for HIV/AIDS and struggling with questions of faith and the use of condoms for HIV/AIDS protection. It also makes policy recommendations for both the Catholic Church and society at large on...
  • January 1, 2003
    In The Spirit of Development: Protestant NGOs, Morality, and Economics in Zimbabwe, Erica Bornstein provides a theoretical analysis of the intersection of religion and development. She undertakes an ethnography of several faith-based development organizations in order to contribute to this discourse. The study details the broader historic and theological background of Protestantism and development and then delves deeper into this sector in the context of the southern African continent....
  • December 1, 2002
    In association with the Worldwatch Institute, Gary Gardner analyzes the recent rise in religious concern with the environment and sustainable development. He believes progress could be enhanced if religious communities and institutions, environmentalists, and advocates of sustainable development realized their common concerns and worked together. Gardner acknowledges the obstacles in the way of such a partnership, including misperceptions and differences on certain salient issues, but...
  • November 30, 2002
    The 2002 Annual Report of the Catholic Medical Mission Board highlights the organization's successes, including the allocation of nearly $100 million and the start of an ambitious initiative, "Born to Live," which is aimed at the prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission. It also contains several extended testimonials that illustrate the impact of the association's programs. It continues with an illustrated timeline of its activities over the previous 75 years and concludes with...
  • November 30, 2002
    This report by the International Council on Human Rights Policy proposes a human rights framework to guide the work of governments and private citizens in ending global poverty, illiteracy, and oppression. The human rights framework presented in the first section of the report addresses rights, responsibilities, and obligations under international law. Section two explores evolving conceptions of state sovereignty and international anti-poverty initiatives, followed by a final section on how...
  • October 14, 2002
    In this press release, the Catholic Medical Mission Board (CMMB) and the Kenya Episcopal Conference (KEC) announce their joint initiative "Born to Live," designed to fight mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Kenya. The memorandum, signed by CMMB and KEC, enables CMMB to implement its prevention of mother-to-child transmission program into 41 hospitals, 94 health centers, and 276 dispensaries. Members express their belief that this faith-based partnership will significantly reduce HIV/AIDS...
  • October 1, 2002
    This essay in the World Bank report "Conservation of Biology in Mountain Ecosystems" describes the Mongolian Sacred Sites Initiative, a collaborative effort in Mongolia made possible by the World Bank-Netherlands Partnership Program, highlighting the role that faith groups can play in the environmental debate. In Mongolia Buddhist monasteries led rituals at sacred sites and discussed how Buddhist teachings promoted respect and care for the environment. The initiative was supported by...
  • October 1, 2002
    In this paper for the Health Economics and HIV/AIDS Research Division of the University of Natal, Jeremy Liebowitz argues that faith-based organizations have inherent advantages in organizing and delivering intervention strategies to combat HIV/AIDS. Utilizing a case study of Uganda, Liebowitz reviews the role of FBOs in delivering information, encouraging open discussion, providing services, and changing behavior within their communities. Paying particular attention to rural areas, he...
  • September 6, 2002
    In her speech to the International Meeting of the Community of Sant'Egidio, Katherine Marshall focuses on the special challenges of globalization today, namely poverty, HIV/AIDS, and inequality in education. She discusses the challenges of global citizenship, the salience of poverty and social justice in the modern world, and threats and opportunities for daily citizens. She believes that something must be done to address the stark differences between the world of abundance and opportunity...
  • September 1, 2002
    This United States Agency for International Development (USAID) report synthesizes presentations made in February 2002 at USAID by four individuals with long-term experience in HIV prevention in Africa. "What Happened in Uganda? Declining HIV Prevalence, Behavior Change, and the National Response" provides statistical data relating to a variety of interventions that have resulted in a decline in incidence and prevalence of HIV, paying particular attention to population-based and gender-based...
  • August 4, 2002
    This World Bank report provides an overview of religious social service organizations in Egypt and Lebanon. The first section focuses on the role that religious social service organizations play in civil society. The researchers examine the ways in which these religious organizations address social inequalities and class stratification in Egypt and Lebanon. The second section of the report provides a case study of the social services provided by the Coptic Orthodox Church in Egypt. The case...
  • August 1, 2002
    This collection of essays, published by the Sicilian Renaissance Institute, explores the role of religious experiences in crime prevention using Sicily as a case study. Contributors include Leoluca Orlando, ex-mayor of Palermo; Cardinal Salvatore Pappalardo; and Mons. Salvatore di Cristina, the Auxiliary Bishop of Palermo. They all emphasize the importance of the role played by the Catholic Church in the governance struggle against the mafia, paying particular attention to various religious...
  • July 1, 2002
    Journeys of Faith describes and analyzes innovative HIV/AIDS programs carried out by churches and other Christian organizations in Mozambique, Namibia, and South Africa. Written by Canon Gideon Byamugisha, Lucy Y. Steinitz, Glen Williams, and Phumzile Zondi, this book is the sixteenth in the Strategies for Hope Series, which argues for the importance of religious institutions in promoting good health. Journeys of Faith is narrative in nature, explaining how religious faith bolstered the...
  • June 4, 2002
    In this statement delivered at a colloquium entitled "Recontres de Fes: Une Ame Pour la Mondialisation," United Religions International Coordinator Andre Porto reflects on the challenges of globalization. He criticizes the overwhelming role of secularism, materialism, and consumerism in the modern global scene. Porto advocates for “Spiritual Citizenship” based on the recognition of common nature and value of diverse peoples through spirituality. While he expresses concern for the negative...
  • June 1, 2002
    In this document, Katherine Marshall details her experiences at the Fez Colloquium and Dialogue about the Challenges of Globalization in June 2002, where she discussed poverty, interdependence, and economic development. This document is a compilation of her informal notes immediately following the event. It provides an overview of the colloquium with its theme of "Giving Soul to Globalization: Paths to Wisdom," a day by day narrative, and her reflections on what was discussed.
  • January 1, 2002
    This UN Habitat report addresses the issue of quality of urban governance as an important factor in eradicating poverty. "Principles and Realities of Urban Governance in Africa" considers the realities of urban governance in Africa and outlines a set of recommendations applicable to realities of African cities. The report recognizes that cities embody diverse histories and connections with the rest of the world; therefore, it advocates increased knowledge and understanding of social and...
  • November 30, 2001
    This World Faiths Development Dialogue publication features extracts of comments and articles from leaders, scholars, and organizations in the wake of the 9/11 attacks on the United States. The quotations address topics ranging from the treatment of women in Islam and the eradication of poverty to the imperative response of all religions to the events of 9/11. Contributors include former Archbishop of Canterbury Dr. George Carey, His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Rabbi Lerner, Caritas...
  • November 30, 2001
    In this factsheet, POLICY Project highlights its work with faith-based organizations fighting HIV/AIDS. Partnering with the (Anglican) Church Province of Southern Africa, POLICY works to incorporate new organizations into existing networks of FBOs fighting HIV/AIDS. The factsheet describes examples of initiatives in Cambodia, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda. Programs include technical assistance, small grants, mentoring, capacity development, awareness raising and training...
  • November 25, 2001
    "Plan of Action: The Ecumenical Response to HIV/AIDS in Africa" recognizes the failure of African churches in side-stepping issues of sexuality and contributing to the stigmatization of the sick. It highlights the theological basis for compassion and concerted action; the destructive impact of early inaction and ambivalence towards HIV/AIDS; the unique strengths and resources that churches bring to bear; and a plan for church engagement in the fight against stigma, discrimination, and the...
  • November 20, 2001
    In this paper, Maryann Cusimano Love discusses the gaps created by capitalism and globalization, including those of capacity, participation, jurisdiction, legitimacy, and ethics. She asks whether religious institutions, commonly described in political science literature as sources of conflict, can help to bridge these gaps. She focuses on the institutions of the US Catholic Church and their ability to alleviate discrepancies caused by globalization. This paper was presented at the American...
  • September 30, 2001
    The CCIH Forum, a publication of Christian Connections for International Health (CCIH), contains articles detailing the work of Christian churches and communities engaged in health care provision. The October 2001 issue includes articles based on the discussions that took place at a CCIH-sponsored conference entitled "Challenges for the Church: AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis." The articles range from comparative studies of church efforts in Uganda, Senegal, and Jamaica to personal...
  • August 31, 2001
    This report by the Commission of the Bishops’ Conferences of the European Community draws upon personal experiences as well as the Catholic Church's social teaching in order to address the concept of global governance and credible mechanisms for its implementation. Global governance is a networked approach to solving international problems engaging governments, business, non-governmental organizations, churches, and religious communities. The report discusses ways in which global governance...
  • June 25, 2001
    This publication is a country report of the HIV/AIDS situation in Indonesia. Published as part of the United Nations General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS, it highlights multisectoral approaches to combat the virus. Programmes include IEC (Information, Education, Communication), prevention, testing and counseling, treatment and care, education and training, research and development, monitoring and evaluation, international cooperation, and laws and regulation. This multidimensional...
  • May 31, 2001
    The statement "HIV/AIDS & Gender Equality: Transforming Attitudes and Behaviors" outlines the Baha'i perspective on critical issues surrounding the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Gender inequality, stigma, and the role of faith communities in mitigating both of these are the main focus. The Baha'i view is that as interaction between people of different faiths and cultures increases, the traditions and practices that discriminate against women will gradually give way; only spiritual transformation can...
  • May 25, 2001
    In "The Impact of Religious Organizations in Promoting HIV/AIDS prevention," Edward C. Green of Synergy Project and the Harvard School of Public Health discusses primary behavior change and the involvement of religious leaders and organizations in HIV/AIDS initiatives. He concludes that resources should be more evenly allocated between prevention initiatives encouraging behavioral change and initiatives that distribute condoms. Countries of interest include Uganda, Senegal, and Jamaica. Green...
  • May 1, 2001

    In this report, Aprodev outlines the work of the New Delhi Colloquium on Christianity, Poverty and Wealth in the 21st Century. The colloquium explored 24 case studies of national and local experiences, and was aimed at revitalizing the debate about these topics within the ecumenical and Christian communities. The report opens with a brief history of the process leading up to the creation of the case studies. It proceeds to outline the new findings of the colloquium, outlines a set of five...
  • April 28, 2001
    David Crocker, Professor at the University of Maryland, analyzes the relationship between globalization, development, and public policy in a presentation to the General Assembly of the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences. He explores the ethical implications of development policies and the need for philosophers and ethicists to engage in moral evaluation. He traces the history of moral philosophers, from Mahatma Gandhi in the 1940s to Paul Streeten and Amaryta Sen in the late 1990s and...
  • March 11, 2001
    In a speech to the Union of American Hebrew Congregations on the 40th anniversary of the Religious Action Center for Reform Judaism, Cardinal Theodore McCarrick discusses Judeo-Catholic cooperation on poverty and social justice issues. He states that he believes Judeo-Christian cooperation is most comprehensive in the United States and urges the religious community to extend its efforts to preventing conflict and deprivation in the Middle East and Africa. He concludes by reaffirming the role...
  • February 26, 2001
    In her address to a February 2001 conference on child poverty convened by then-British Chancellor of the Exchequer Gordon Brown, the Reverend Agnes Mukandoli speaks of the church's efforts to combat child poverty in Rwanda. Emphasis is placed on maternal education and empowerment. Mukandoli urges her audience to renew its commitment to achieving international development goals by 2015 and thanks international organizations such as the United Nations and the World Bank for their contributions....
  • January 1, 2001
    Prepared by Richard Bonney and Asaf Hussain from the University of Leicester Center for the History of Religious and Political Pluralism, "Faith Communities and the Development Agenda" surveyed a number of faith communities in Britain to determine their level of awareness on development issues so that an assessment for future collaboration could be made. People from eight religious traditions were surveyed: Baha'i, Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Jain, Jewish, Muslim, and Sikh. The study...
  • January 1, 2001
    This report is the product of the All Africa Anglican Conference, held in August 13-16, 2001, in Cape Town. It serves as a guide that outlines an HIV/AIDS counteraction plan for the Anglican Communion. The plan includes measures that address prevention, pastoral care, counseling, HIV care, and treating the dying and dead with dignity. It also emphasizes the need for education, training, and effective leadership in order to diminish the stigma surrounding those affected by HIV/AIDS and their...
  • November 30, 2000
    This document discusses issues of sustainable development and ecology from a religious perspective. It describes the cooperative effort of the World Bank, the World Wildlife Fund, and the Alliance for Religions and Conservation to preserve the Mongolian environment in the post-Soviet era. Modern conservation efforts have been supported by the environmental reverence, deification, and overall respect which is foundational to traditional Mongolian belief systems and Buddhism in the country. In...
  • November 15, 2000
    This Alliance of Religions and Conservation (ARC) news release outlines various actions taken by religious groups around the world to protect animals and the environment. The document includes a summary of ARC projects and a briefing for journalists. Notable projects include an environmental audit and conversation program undertaken by the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism and the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, a biosphere reserve created by the Islamic government in Saudi...
  • November 1, 2000
    In this memorandum, president of the International Center for Religion and Diplomacy Douglas Johnston recounts the meeting of prominent Sudanese and international religious leaders and scholars which took place in Khartoum in 2000. The summit addressed the religious aspects of political conflict and social tensions in Sudan. The government sought, through this meeting, to portray a more egalitarian and open attitude toward all citizens. Co-sponsors of the meeting included the International...
  • August 31, 2000
    Martin Kaplan, lawyer and national officer of the American Jewish Committee, outlines the importance of environmental care in relation to Jewish teachings in the Torah. He points to broad Jewish themesethics of responsibility, commitment to justice, obligation to work to heal the worldthat provide a foundation for theologically-motivated environmental action. He describes the extent and urgency of current environmental challenges, common ground found with Christianity, and the imperative to...
  • August 31, 2000
    In the final report of its "Workshop on Poverty," the Millennium World Peace Summit for Religious and Spiritual Leaders affirms the need for attention to poverty and its ill effects. The report addresses hunger, illiteracy, and unequal distribution of wealth, among other symptoms of poverty. It calls on the United Nations to devote more attention to the eradication of poverty, to broaden approaches to poverty reduction beyond economics, to actively renounce corruption in all forms, and to...
  • August 31, 2000
    In this article from the B’Nai B’Rrith Center for Public Policy, Bernardo Kliksberg, the coordinator of the Inter-American Development Bank and the president of the Human Development Commission of the Latin American Jewish Congress at the time, describes the pervasive poverty in Latin America. He particularly discusses the struggle of a large impoverished segment of the Jewish population in Latin America and how they have been affected by what he calls "the decline of the middle class."...
  • August 15, 2000
    In this case study, Bank Islam Malaysia Berhad Managing Director, Dato' Ahmad Tajudin Abdul Rahman, explains the Islamic banking system in Malaysia, specifically detailing his experience in bank operations at the Bank Islam, Malaysia's first entirely Islamic bank. The paper first looks at the historical dominance of conventional banking in Malaysia, exploring Bank Islam's approach to propagating an entirely new form of banking in Malaysia. The study then looks at the expansion of the Islamic...
  • August 13, 2000
    In this working paper which provided the basis for his keynote address presented at the Fourth International Conference on Islamic Economics and Banking, Ismail Sirageldin assesses poverty reduction strategies through the lens of Islamic ethics. Islam in this context is understood as an ethical system based on four basic tenets: unity, equilibrium, free will, and responsibility. Together, these tenets serve as an "ethical filter" for assessing social policies and require that all such...
  • August 13, 2000
    In this speech delivered at the 4th International Conference on Islamic Economics and Banking, Saudi Prince Mohamed Al-Faisal Al-Saud traces the history of Islamic finance beginning with the establishment of the Islamic Development Bank in 1972. He then discusses the basis of Islamic economic theory and warns against overemphasis of marketable products at the expense of underlying philosophy and theory. He concludes by delineating the moral obligations that Muslims have to end poverty and...
  • June 1, 2000
    The Church at the Grassroots in Latin America: Perspectives on Thirty Years of Activism assesses the major impact of the Catholic Church, especially its liberationist movements, on Latin American society and culture from 1970 to 2000. Contributors offer case studies from Brazil, Ecuador, Chile, Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, and Nicaragua, focusing on analysis of the local, grassroots level of social and political activism. Empirical accounts offer insight on the Church's involvement in...
  • March 10, 2000
    In this joint statement, the participants of the Conference on Alleviating Poverty in Africa, sponsored by the Council of Anglican Provinces of Africa and the World Bank, discuss issues of particular importance to Africa and its development, such as poverty, education, health, governance, and economic growth. The participants included representatives of 20 African nations and 17 Christian denominations, as well as representatives of the Archbishop of Canterbury and the president of the...
  • February 22, 2000
    Author Charles L. Glenn reviews the policies and practices of governments in the United States and Europe in regards to interactions with faith-based schools and also with such social agencies as the Salvation Army and Teen Challenge. He seeks to answer key theoretical and practical questions: Why should government make greater use of faith-based providers? How could they do so without violating First Amendment limits? What working relationships protect the goals and standards both of...
  • February 1, 2000
    In this article from Development in Practice, Kurt Alan Ver Beek explores an aspect of religion and development not often researched: the significance of spirituality and unorganized belief systems in the daily decisions of many people in developing countries, especially Latin America and Africa. Using a case study of the Lenca people in Honduras, Ver Beek describes the influence of spirituality on agriculture, health, and social action. He then provides statistics that show that development...
  • January 1, 2000
    Edited by Cynthia Sampson and John Paul Lederach, this collection of essays chronicles, analyzes, and evaluates the Mennonite contribution to a new cultural paradigm in conflict resolution and peacebuilding theory and practice which includes religion-based approaches. Here, essayists provide a thorough account of Mennonite initiatives to prevent, resolve, or transform conflict in a variety of settings. Part One of this volume sets the subject in historical context. Part Two presents case...
  • January 1, 2000
    This report by William F. Ryan, SJ, published in cooperation with the International Development Research Centre, expands on the themes of a Science, Religion, and Development project conference. Major themes include alternatives to reductionist science, the concept of worldviews, the dangers of dualisms, the necessity of reducing oneself to zero in order to be an effective leader, community-based approaches, religion vs. spirituality, and plans for future action. The conference took place in...
  • November 30, 1999

    This introduction to the World Bank's World Development Report 2000/2001 describes poverty as a multi-dimensional problem and documents its extent and distribution across the world. Then, it offers strategies for its reduction within this framework, including opportunity promotion, empowerment of the poor, and security enhancement. Finally, it examines challenges and opportunities for the implementation of these strategies by avenues like private investment, legal reform, and improved risk...
  • November 30, 1999
    This paper by the World Faiths Development Dialogue is based on a similar paper entitled "Understanding Poverty." It critiques the World Bank's World Development Report (WDR) 2000/1 for failing to address the main issues raised by religious communities such as the importance of values, moral education, and the responsibilities of the rich towards the poor in fighting global poverty. This paper details these issues to provide a more comprehensive understanding of poverty than...
  • June 30, 1999
    This book, published by the International Development Research Centre in 2000 and edited by Sharon Harper, reflects on the fundamental links between science, religion, and development. It also considers the importance of these relationships in the implementation of development projects. A compilation of work from a variety of the authors, the chapters of the book are entitled "The Principle of Fundamental Oneness," "Solidarity with the Poor," "Rediscovering the Resources of Religion," and...
  • June 1, 1999
    This document by the World Faiths Development Dialogue (WFDD) comments on the World Bank's World Development Report 2000 and focuses on religion's role in development, human rights, poverty, the environment, and cultural issues. "A Different Perspective" endorses several aspects of the World Development Report, but also engages in constructive criticism. It stresses the need to focus on people-centered development that helps the most marginalized, highlights the importance of recognizing...
  • February 1, 1999
    This work by Kees Biekart examines the political aspects of civil society building and the role of non-governmental development aid agencies during democratic transitions in Central America. The Politics of Civil Society Building is a comparative study of the policies, practices, and political impact of European NGO aid interventions. In his research, Biekart first discusses the dynamics of transition and changing relations between the state and civil society, explaining the historical...
  • January 14, 1999
    These three papers discuss values and views of poverty within the framework of the authors' respective faiths. The papers were presented by Buddhist, Baha'i, and Ismaili Muslim faith delegates at the World Bank-organized conference "Values, Norms and Poverty: A Consultation on the World Development Report 2000/1." The first paper is "Religious Values and the Measurement of Poverty: A Buddhist Perspective" by P.D. Premasiri of University of Peradeniya in Sri Lanka. The second paper is...
  • January 1, 1999
    In Religion and Politics in South Africa, Abdulkader Tayob and other contributing authors explore the role of religion in fashioning a more democratic society in South Africa, as well as the possible role of religions in fashioning values on a national scale. From the mid-1970s onward, Christian denominations increased awareness of the injustice of apartheid in South Africa through media and scholarship. Religion became a catalyst for reform. More strikingly, opposition leaders referred to...
  • December 1, 1998
    In this paper, John D. Clark discusses the challenges of globalization and various methods to move globalization along a more ethical course. He believes "ethical globalization" is effective and necessary for a number of reasons. First, certain problems can be solved only on an international scale, and second, citizens, rather than politician, must shape the international ethical, political agenda. Thirdly, governments and international institutions must be held accountable for their actions;...
  • October 31, 1998
    In this discussion paper, the World Faiths Development Dialogue suggests key issues to be considered in the World Bank's World Development Report 2001, which focuses on poverty and development. Recommendations include (i) the danger posed by globalization to cultural diversity, (ii) the necessity of equitable distribution in development, and (iii) the human responsibility to take care of all living things. The paper also recommends addressing the importance of social networks and...
  • October 17, 1998
    The World Faiths Development Dialogue (WFDD) discusses a declaration of rights and responsibilities for the religions of the world that analyzes economic and social developmental successes within a religious framework. WFDD believes development cannot be evaluated solely on quantitative criteria. The ethical intentions and outcomes of programs must also be considered. It lists important, ethical principles and suggestions for translating principles into action. Finally, it points out a...
  • July 15, 1998
    This volume presents detailed research of the nonprofit sectors in Brazil, Ghana, Egypt, India, and Thailand. It recognizes that there has been a significant upsurge of organized private, nonprofit activity in Asia, Africa, and Latin America in recent years, and that there is a new appreciation of the important role that nonprofit organizations can play in the processes of economic and political change. Long recognized as instruments of relief and promoters of human rights, such organizations...
  • March 8, 1998
    The World Conference on Religion and Peace report from the "Religions and Poverty" conference of March 1998 includes the conference summary, papers presented, conclusions, and final declaration. The conference, resulting from cooperation of the World Conference and Religion and Peace (WCRP) and the Social Development and Poverty Elimination Division of the UNDP and hosted by Rissho Kosei-kai, convened religious leaders and development experts in Tokyo to discuss common values and...
  • February 19, 1998

    In this closing statement, the co-chairs of the World Faiths Development Dialogue, Archbishop of Canterbury George Carey and World Bank President James Wolfensohn, report on the progress made during the World Faiths and Development conference between religious leaders and development experts. They emphasize areas of consensus, such as the importance of promoting both material and spiritual well-being and the need to learn from a broad range of secular and religious actors involved in...
  • February 16, 1998
    In this address delivered at the World Faiths Development Dialogue Meeting of Religious Leaders, Jordanian Prince El Hassan bin Talal discusses the Islamic economic model, particularly in reference to fiscal finance and sustainable development. He avoids delving too deeply into the complex relationship between economics and ethics, but does explain the limitations of Islamic theology to ensure necessary action on issues such as environmental protection. In the address, he attempts to...
  • February 1, 1998
    In an address at the World Faiths Development Dialogue meeting of religious leaders, Prince El Hassan bin Talal of Jordan discusses development, economics, and ethics. He seeks to identify the common ground among world religions in economic development and the historical common ground of economics and ethics. He believes leaders such as Amartya Sen and the World Bank are directing economic dialogue in the right direction, towards a renewed focus on welfare economics. The address was given in...
  • February 1, 1998
    This collection of papers offers perspectives on economic development from a variety of religious traditions including Baha’i, Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Sikhism, and Taoism. It provides a critique of contemporary economic affairs and suggests alternative modes for development inspired from religious foundations and reflection. Produced in 1998, the publication developed out of the World Bank-World Religions Meeting at Lambeth Palace, London during which the...
  • November 30, 1997
    This World Faiths Development Dialogue study tells the story of the National Forum of Fish Workers, a Christian-inspired movement that began in Kerala, India in the 1970s and now includes fishing communities of many faiths. The report give a background of Indian fisheries, involvement of the church and women, and the growth of fish workers' organizations. It concludes by putting the National Forum of Fish Workers into a broader Christian context of development as a means to achieve freedom.
  • May 1, 1997
    This statement was released in 1997 by the Religious Working Group on the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. It outlines seven moral principles that serve as responsibilities and guidelines for institutional action. Focusing on debt restructuring and new loans, the statement advocates against "debt sustainability," because it traps people in poverty as they continue to pay resource-draining debts. The statement is deeply-rooted in the Christian tradition, but it acknowledges...
  • May 1, 1997
    Through an extended case study of rural Guatemala, The Soul of Development: Biblical Christianity and Economic Transformation in Guatemala reviews the impact that evangelical Protestantism has on a post-conflict Latin American society in regards to its economic success, change in traditional culture, and shift to democratic capitalism. In her analysis, Amy Sherman addresses Max Weber’s historical argument that Protestantism is the catalyst for peace and prosperity. She makes the claim that as...
  • January 1, 1997
    In this seminal text on Pentecostalism in Brazil, Andrew Chesnut explores the causes of the remarkable expansion of this faith among the Brazilian poor. In addition to exploring the roles of economic and political conditions, he puts particular emphasis on the role of faith healing, arguing that Brazil's most marginalized populations are drawn to churches that promise to deliver them from various forms of illness. The empirical argument is based largely on ethnographic research in the city of...
  • December 31, 1996
    In this essay, Fernando Reimers analyzes the importance of education in promoting Latin American economic development and democratic institutions. He evaluates the current widespread education system and calls for an alternative. Using the Fe y Alegría system as a central example, Reimers then discusses the innovative ways in which NGOs have contributed to education in these countries. He argues that many non-governmental agencies, especially those rooted in Christian values, produce a more...
  • August 8, 1996
    Despite Americans' traditional emphasis on the separation of church and state, both in theory and practice, few are aware of the hundreds of millions of public dollars that flow annually to religiously based nonprofit organizations. Monsma explores the implications of this financial relationship between government and faith-based organizations, using data gathered in a large nation-wide survey of nearly 800 FBOs. He argues for a new standard for evaluating the relationship between federal...
  • February 29, 1996
    This document contains the code of conduct for the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and NGOs involved in disaster relief. The code lays out certain standards of behavior and expectations through which operations can maintain independence and effectiveness. It emphasizes the need to comply with all international humanitarian law. Furthermore, the code lays out a clear description of the working relationship the Red Cross/Crescent strives for between host governments, donor...
  • October 19, 1995
    Edited by Douglas Johnston and Cynthia Sampson, Religion, The Missing Dimension of Statecraft describes twentieth-century cases in which religion or spirituality made a significant contribution to non-violent conflict resolution. Examples range from post-World War II Franco-German reconciliation to the end of apartheid in South Africa and the role of the Philippine Catholic Church in the 1986 revolution. Other supporting essays explore the role of religion in political theory and development...
  • May 1, 1995
    "Ministry, Union, the Church and Teachers: Bolivia's Partners in Innovation" assesses the implementation and sustainability of interactive radio instruction for mathematics in Bolivian primary schools, a project carried out by the organization Fe y Alegría and later handed over to the Bolivian government for management. Over the course of seven years, the program spread to reach approximately 600,000 primary school children and 8,000 teachers. This report analyzes the effects of the Radio...
  • November 30, 1992
    This declaration outlines an interfaith code of ethics for international business based on justice, mutual respect, stewardship, and honesty, values found within all three of the Abrahamic religions. The first section reviews the discussions and methodology which shaped the declaration's content. Section two more deeply explores the four key principles before offering more specific guidelines regarding economic systems, business operations, and individual conduct in business matters. The...
  • April 30, 1991
    In Religion and Politics in Latin America: Liberation Theology and Christian Democracy, author Edward Lynch explores the ways in which religious motivations inspire political involvement, focusing on two important Catholic lay movements: liberation theology and Christian democracy. Using Nicaragua and Venezuela as case studies, the book is divided into two parts, “Ideologies in Theory” and “Ideologies in Practice.” Lynch shows that rather than being as different as many perceive, the two...
  • January 1, 1991
    In The Emergence of Liberation Theology, Christian Smith explains the origins and development of the liberation theology movement, a school of Roman Catholic thought that teaches that a primary duty of the church must be to promote social and economic justice. He uses interviews, texts, historical documents, and statistics taken from South America as well as Europe and North America to put together a comprehensive social history of the movement from the 1930s until the present. Using the...
  • November 20, 1989
    The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) outlines the civil, political, economic, social, and cultural rights of children. Regarding child rights, the convention stipulates that every child has the right to life, his or her identity, to be raised by his or her parents, to be protected from abuse or exploitation, and to have their privacy protected. The treaty also forbids capital punishment for children. The UNCRC was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on...
  • June 30, 1987
    Sollicitudo Rei Socialis, released on the twentieth anniversary of Paul VI's Populorum Progressio, continues in the tradition of Catholic social teaching begun by Leo XIII and focuses on the notion of development, especially the influential, large-scale actions of nations and corporations. The accumulation of wealth in North America and Europe has led to an increasing disparity vis-à-vis poorer, developing nations in Africa and Latin America. The encyclical decries the fact that nations...
  • March 26, 1967
    Popolorum Progressio, released amid the tumultuous late 1960s, expresses Pope Paul VI's concerns regarding growing global inequality and the prevalence of dire poverty in the developing world in light of his own travels to Latin America and Europe. It links basic tenets of Christianity with the moral imperatives created by the unequal distribution of material resources. In addition, the encyclical decries the political instability and social conflict that often flow from such radically unjust...
  • April 22, 1954
    The Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees defines who is a refugee and outline their rights and the responsibilities of states that grant asylum. According to Article 4 of the document, states who are signatory to the convention are to provide refugees in their territories the freedom to practice their religion; the convention also prohibits discrimination on the basis of religion. The United Nations adopted the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees in 1951. It was initially...
  • August 1, 1952
    Exsul Familia, an Apostolic Constitution of Pope Pius XII, is considered a magisterial magna carta on migration that systematically lays outs the challenges of and principles for providing spiritual assistance to migrants. Holding up the Holy Family (Jesus, Mary, and Joseph) as refugee archetypes, Pius XII first reviews the Church's past efforts, including care for pilgrims and pastoral ministry in diverse languages, as well as more recent work with immigrants to the Americas and across...
  • In this booklet, Christian Aid assesses the challenges facing African churches in their fight to stop the HIV/AIDS pandemic and explores ways for churches and individuals in the United Kingdom to assist them in their mission. It describes in detail what the HIV/AIDS pandemic looks like in Africa, summarizes the salient obstacles for churches, and highlights the problem of orphans. The discussion then shifts towards action, detailing unsuccessful behavioral changes, reasons for hope, and steps...
  • Catholic Relief Services (CRS), an organization that coordinates relief and development efforts in over 100 countries, has translated its experience into reports, case studies, and guidelines, which it makes available online. The Resource Page provides information on topics ranging from agriculture and education to water sanitation and microfinance. The page emphasizes resources for peacebuilding and combating HIV/AIDS, and more general tools for program implementation and development. The...
  • The Ecumenical Advocacy Alliance represents a global network of churches and faith-inspired organizations who work to fight injustice and assaults on human dignity. The EAA's online Resource Library includes information and documents issues like global trade, HIV/AIDS, and conflict resolution, in formats ranging from news articles and reports to speech transcripts and press releases. Users can search for resources through simple keywords, by related event or subject, by format, or by...
  • In this pamphlet, Expanded Church Response (ECR) outlines its ECR Trust, a network of Protestant churches responding to HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria in Zambia. ECR seeks to provide moral guidance for the country, to respond to the biblical mandate to help the vulnerable, to coordinate and develop human capital that could be used for volunteerism, to effectively use physical assets around the country, and to facilitate collaboration of other faith-based organizations with similar...
  • In this article for the Earth Charter Initiative, Nigerian researcher Yakubu Joseph offers a view of sustainable development that comes from personal experience in African churches. Joseph begins by explaining how, until recently, African Christians did not find the idea of sustainability relevant and instead were taught that God would provide in the future. Using a biblical framework and a Christian approach to ethics, Joseph emphasizes how African Christians actually ought to support...
  • A Netherlands initiative, supported by organizations within the Catholic, Protestant, Islamic, and Hindu traditions, the Knowledge Centre Religion and Development unites academic research with practical insight to improve the work of development organizations around the world. The Knowledge Centre's website offers online access to many of its publications, including topical overview booklets and speech transcripts. Documents from the Knowledge Centre's conferences on religion and development...
  • The Micah Network unites over 300 Christian relief, development, and justice organizations from across the globe. The organization's website offers resources on the intersection of development and disability, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and community development best practices. The Integral Mission Resource Library offers congregations and church partners a variety of resources intentionally gathered from different regions of the world and ranging from theological papers to worship resources,...
  • In this paper, Dick Cremins, S.J., outlines a plan to promote the "A&B" method among non-faith-based AIDS-prevention organizations in Africa at a symposium hosted by the Pan-African Christian AIDS Network (PACANet). He details the effectiveness of "A&B" (“Abstain” and “Be faithful”) in comparison to “C” ("Condoms"), the primary difference between the Catholic strategy in fighting HIV/AIDS and that of secular and/or non-Catholic organizations. He points out that in order to effectively win out...
  • This case study outlines the history of Sarkan Zoumountsi (Hausa for "chain of solidarity"), a development association in Cameroon that works to improve education and relieve poverty for primarily women and children. The study assesses the association's achievements, including the establishment of peaceful relations between Christian and Muslim communities. Sarkan Zoumountsi is an Islamic-based organization, and the report discusses the impact of religion on the organization’s operations and...
  • This resource page provides links to other US government bodies which partner with FBOs and details how organizations can best position themselves to connect with USAID in order to further development operations abroad. As part of the Bush Administration's Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, USAID began to work more closely with faith-based organizations conducting development work overseas. In 2002, the Center for Faith-Based and Community Initiatives was founded at USAID to aid...