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United States United States

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Religion in US Politics Religion in US Politics
Religion has long been a staple of American politics. At the national level politicians have continually evoked religious themes, whether addressing foreign policy, social,...

RELATED RESOURCES: RELIGION AND PEACE

Mosaic Fall 2003
Publication
Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies
克罗克国际和平研究所

Organization
Religions for Peace
Organization
Life & Peace Institute
Organization

Sen. Marco Rubio on the Important Role of Legislative Prayer in American Society

August 8, 2013
Prayer has been a hallmark of not just the Senate, but the House of Representatives, and state and local legislatures around the country. Legislative prayer is as familiar as the Pledge of Allegiance, and has a longer pedigree. Yet, it is a practice that is under assault by those who badly misunderstand Americans' unique appreciation for the complementary roles of faith and freedom in our constitutional republic. [...] Our Founders, and generations of Americans since, sought freedom of religion, not freedom from religion. They sought a place where they had freedom of conscience, not a place devoid of religion. This is part of the genius of America, a place where we do not feel threatened by each other's faiths. While the First Amendment rightly prohibits the government from establishing and imposing an official church, religion has been welcomed in public discourse and legislative chambers from the beginning, and we are a stronger nation because of it.