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Interreligiousdialogue1

Interreligious Dialogue

Quotes (74)

Interfaith dialogue describes exchanges among religious practitioners and communities on matters of doctrine and issues of mutual concern in culture and politics. Explore the engagement of the world's religious traditions around theological questions and in their efforts to collaborate on questions of peace, human rights, and economic and social development.


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  • May 9, 2009
    In the face of this situation, where the opponents of religion seek not simply to silence its voice but to replace it with their own, the need for believers to be true to their principles and beliefs is felt all the more keenly. Muslims and Christians, precisely because of the burden of our common history so often marked by misunderstanding, must today strive to be known and recognized as worshippers of God faithful to prayer, eager to uphold and live by the Almighty's decrees, merciful and...
  • May 9, 2009
    Together, Christians and Muslims are impelled to seek all that is just and right. We are bound to step beyond our particular interests and to encourage others, civil servants and leaders in particular, to do likewise in order to embrace the profound satisfaction of serving the common good, even at personal cost. And we are reminded that because it is our common human dignity which gives rise to universal human rights, they hold equally for every man and woman, irrespective of his or her...
  • May 11, 2009
    From this perspective, dear friends, we see the possibility of a unity which is not dependent upon uniformity. While the differences we explore in inter-religious dialogue may at times appear as barriers, they need not overshadow the common sense of awe and respect for the universal, for the absolute and for truth, which impel religious peoples to converse with one another in the first place. Indeed it is the shared conviction that these transcendent realities have their source in—and...
  • November 10, 1961
    Unfortunately, however, the sort of unity whereby all believers in Christ profess the same faith, practise the same worship and obey the same supreme authority, is no more evident among the Christians of today than it was in bygone ages. We do, however, see more and more men of good will in various parts of the world earnestly striving to bring about this visible unity among Christians, a unity which truly accords with the Divine Saviour's intentions, commands and desires; and this to Us is a...
  • November 30, 1980
    The contemporary Church is profoundly conscious that only on the basis of the mercy of God will she be able to carry out the tasks that derive from the teaching of the Second Vatican Council, and, in the first place, the ecumenical task which aims at uniting all those who confess Christ. As she makes many efforts in this direction, the Church confesses with humility that only that love which is more powerful than the weakness of human divisions can definitively bring about that unity which...
  • June 29, 2009
    Religious freedom does not mean religious indifferentism, nor does it imply that all religions are equal. Discernment is needed regarding the contribution of cultures and religions, especially on the part of those who wield political power, if the social community is to be built up in a spirit of respect for the common good. [...] "The whole man and all men" is also the criterion for evaluating cultures and religions.
  • June 29, 2009
    The Christian revelation of the unity of the human race presupposes a metaphysical interpretation of the "humanum" in which relationality is an essential element [italics in original]. Other cultures and religions teach brotherhood and peace and are therefore of enormous importance to integral human development. Some religious and cultural attitudes, however, do not fully embrace the principle of love and truth and therefore end up retarding or even obstructing authentic human development....
  • December 7, 1990
    All forms of missionary activity are marked by an awareness that one is furthering human freedom by proclaiming Jesus Christ. [...] Religious freedom, which is still at times limited or restricted, remains the premise and guarantee of all the freedoms that ensure the common good of individuals and peoples. It is to be hoped that authentic religious freedom will be granted to all people everywhere. [...] But it is not a question of the religion of the majority or the minority, but of an...
  • May 25, 1995
    The [Second Vatican] Council states that the Church of Christ "subsists in the Catholic Church, which is governed by the Successor of Peter and by the Bishops in communion with him", and at the same time acknowledges that "many elements of sanctification and of truth can be found outside her visible structure. These elements, however, as gifts properly belonging to the Church of Christ, possess an inner dynamism towards Catholic unity". [...] Indeed, the elements of sanctification and truth...
  • May 25, 1995
    In its historical survey the Council Decree Unitatis Redintegratio has in mind the unity which, in spite of everything, was experienced in the first millennium and in a certain sense now serves as a kind of model. [...] The Church's journey began in Jerusalem on the day of Pentecost and its original expansion in the oikoumene of that time was centred around Peter and the Eleven (cf. Acts 2:14). The structures of the Church in the East and in the West evolved in reference to that Apostolic...
  • May 25, 1995
    Here it is not a question of altering the deposit of faith, changing the meaning of dogmas, eliminating essential words from them, accommodating truth to the preferences of a particular age, or suppressing certain articles of the Creed under the false pretext that they are no longer understood today. The unity willed by God can be attained only by the adherence of all to the content of revealed faith in its entirety. In matters of faith, compromise is in contradiction with God who is Truth....
  • November 21, 1964
    For men who believe in Christ and have been truly baptized are in communion with the Catholic Church even though this communion is imperfect. The differences that exist in varying degrees between them and the Catholic Church-whether in doctrine and sometimes in discipline, or concerning the structure of the Church-do indeed create many obstacles, sometimes serious ones, to full ecclesiastical communion. The ecumenical movement is striving to overcome these obstacles. But even in spite of them...
  • November 21, 1964
    In these days when cooperation in social matters is so widespread, all men without exception are called to work together, with much greater reason all those who believe in God, but most of all, all Christians in that they bear the name of Christ. [...] This cooperation, which has already begun in many countries, should be developed more and more, particularly in regions where a social and technical evolution is taking place be it in a just evaluation of the dignity of the human person, the...
  • August 6, 1964
    But we do not wish to turn a blind eye to the spiritual and moral values of the various non-Christian religions, for we desire to join with them in promoting and defending common ideals in the spheres of religious liberty, human brotherhood, education, culture, social welfare, and civic order. Dialogue is possible in all these great projects, which are our concern as much as theirs, and we will not fail to offer opportunities for discussion in the event of such an offer being favorably...
  • December 7, 1965
    God, Who has fatherly concern for everyone, has willed that all men should constitute one family and treat one another in a spirit of brotherhood. For having been created in the image of God [...] all men are called to one and the same goal, namely God Himself. For this reason, love for God and neighbor is the first and greatest commandment. Sacred Scripture, however, teaches us that the love of God cannot be separated from love of neighbor: "If there is any other commandment, it is summed up...
  • November 21, 1964
    The Church recognizes that in many ways she is linked with those who, being baptized, are honored with the name of Christian. [...] For there are many who honor Sacred Scripture, taking it as a norm of belief and a pattern of life, and who show a sincere zeal. They lovingly believe in God the Father Almighty and in Christ, the Son of God and Saviour. They are consecrated by baptism, in which they are united with Christ. They also recognize and accept other sacraments within their own Churches...
  • November 21, 1964
    In the first place we must recall the people to whom the testament and the promises were given and from whom Christ was born according to the flesh. [...] But the plan of salvation also includes those who acknowledge the Creator. In the first place amongst these there are the Mohamedans, who, professing to hold the faith of Abraham, along with us adore the one and merciful God, who on the last day will judge mankind. Nor is God far distant from those who in shadows and images seek the unknown...
  • November 21, 1964
    Christ, the one Mediator, established and continually sustains here on earth His holy Church, the community of faith, hope and charity, as an entity with visible delineation through which He communicated truth and grace to all. [...] This is the one Church of Christ which in the Creed is professed as one, holy, catholic and apostolic, which our Saviour, after His Resurrection, commissioned Peter to shepherd, and him and the other apostles to extend and direct with authority, which He erected...
  • October 25, 1965
    Likewise, other religions found everywhere try to counter the restlessness of the human heart, each in its own manner, by proposing "ways," comprising teachings, rules of life, and sacred rites. The Catholic Church rejects nothing that is true and holy in these religions. She regards with sincere reverence those ways of conduct and of life, those precepts and teachings which, though differing in many aspects from the ones she holds and sets forth, nonetheless often reflect a ray of that Truth...
  • October 28, 1965
    True, the Jewish authorities and those who followed their lead pressed for the death of Christ; still, what happened in His passion cannot be charged against all the Jews, without distinction, then alive, nor against the Jews of today. Although the Church is the new people of God, the Jews should not be presented as rejected or accursed by God, as if this followed from the Holy Scriptures. All should see to it, then, that in catechetical work or in the preaching of the word of God they do not...
  • October 28, 1965
    The Church regards with esteem also the Moslems. They adore the one God, living and subsisting in Himself; merciful and all- powerful, the Creator of heaven and earth, who has spoken to men; they take pains to submit wholeheartedly to even His inscrutable decrees, just as Abraham, with whom the faith of Islam takes pleasure in linking itself, submitted to God. Though they do not acknowledge Jesus as God, they revere Him as a prophet. They also honor Mary, His virgin Mother; at times they even...
  • October 28, 1965
    Religions, however, that are bound up with an advanced culture have struggled to answer the same questions by means of more refined concepts and a more developed language. Thus in Hinduism, men contemplate the divine mystery and express it through an inexhaustible abundance of myths and through searching philosophical inquiry. They seek freedom from the anguish of our human condition either through ascetical [sic] practices or profound meditation or a flight to God with love and trust. Again,...
  • January 1, 1886
    [... W]e do hereby affirm that the Christian unity [...] can be restored only by the return of all Christian communions to the principles of unity exemplified by the undivided Catholic Church during the first ages of its existence; which principles we believe to be the substantial deposit of Christian Faith and Order committed by Christ and his Apostles to the Church unto the end of the world, and therefore incapable of compromise or surrender by those who have been ordained to be its...
  • January 1, 1886
    As inherent parts of this sacred deposit, and therefore as essential to the restoration of unity among the divided branches of Christendom, we account the following, to wit:

    a. The Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments as the revealed Word of God.

    b. The Nicene Creed as the sufficient statement of the Christian Faith.

    c. The two Sacraments, Baptism and the Supper of the Lord, ministered with unfailing use of Christ's words of institution and of the elements ordained by Him.

    d. The...
  • January 1, 1886
    We, Bishops of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America [...] do hereby solemnly declare to all whom it may concern [...]

    2. That we believe that all who have been duly baptized with water, in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, are members of the Holy Catholic Church;

    3. That in all things of human ordering or human choice, relating to modes of worship and discipline, or to traditional customs, this Church is ready in the spirit of love and...
  • January 1, 2002
    The relationship expressed through the visible marks of Churches Uniting in Christ will not be structural consolidation but a unity in diversity among churches that, though many, will understand themselves to be one community in Christ. From the moment of inauguration, the life of these churches will be visibly intertwined as never before. From the moment of inauguration, their relationship, with God's help, will not be one of friendly coexistence and consultation but of binding community...
  • August 31, 1991
    The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America engages in local, regional, national, and world councils of churches and other ecumenical agencies. In these relationships the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America is guided by the evangelical and the representative principles. The evangelical principle means that official membership will be established only with such ecumenical organizations as are composed exclusively of churches, which confess Jesus Christ as divine Lord and Savior. The...
  • August 31, 1991
    For the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, the characteristics of full communion are theological and missiological implications of the Gospel that allow variety and flexibility. These characteristics stress that the Church act ecumenically for the sake of the world, not for itself alone. They will include at least the following ...
  • a mutual recognition of Baptism and a sharing of the Lord’s Supper, allowing for joint worship and an exchangeability of members;
  • a mutual recognition...
  • November 1, 1974
    Fruitful dialogue is difficult, if not impossible, unless participants share the same understanding of the authority of Scripture or unless conversations are held for the purpose of reaching agreement about Biblical authority as a first step toward discussion of other areas of doctrine. It remains a basic principle for the Synod that the unity in the church which we seek is not an external unification imposed from without by the adoption of common polities and by organizational affiliation or...
  • September 12, 2006
    In the seventh conversation edited by Professor Khoury, the emperor [Manuel II Paleologus, 1350-1425] touches on the theme of the holy war. [...] [H]e addresses his interlocutor with a startling brusqueness, a brusqueness that we find unacceptable, on the central question about the relationship between religion and violence in general, saying: "Show me just what Mohammed brought that was new, and there you will find things only evil and inhuman, such as his command to spread by the sword...
  • September 24, 2002
    Terrorism is a manifestation of evil in our world. The acts that were perpetrated on 11 September 2001, like other acts of indiscriminate violence against civilians, are expressions of an absence of respect for the most basic principles of human rights, morality and religion. No authentic religious doctrine supports such acts, and no political cause can justify them. Governments have a responsibility to protect innocent people from such indiscriminate violence, and to restore a sense of...
  • November 28, 2006
    Christians and Muslims, following their respective religions, point to the truth of the sacred character and dignity of the person. This is the basis of our mutual respect and esteem, this is the basis for cooperation in the service of peace between nations and peoples, the dearest wish of all believers and all people of good will.
  • October 29, 2007
    The initiative of the Common Word is sorely needed by the entire world. All too often, religion is associated with violence and intolerance, and the compassionate ethos, which is at the heart of every major faith, gets pushed to the sidelines. The assertion of the principle of love, which is so central to both the Muslim and the Christian traditions, should be paradigmatic of the religious response to the fearful realities of our time. We must reclaim our traditions from the extremists....
  • If only the People of the Book had believed and been righteous, We should indeed have blotted out their iniquities and admitted them to gardens of bliss. If only they had stood fast by the Law, the Gospel, and all the revelation that was sent to them from their Lord, they would have enjoyed happiness from every side. There is from among them a party on the right course: but many of them follow a course that is evil. O Messenger! proclaim the (message) which hath been sent to thee from thy...
  • Those who believe (in the Qur'an), and those who follow the Jewish (scriptures), and the Christians and the Sabians,—any who believe in Allah and the Last Day, and work righteousness, shall have their reward with their Lord; on them shall be no fear, nor shall they grieve.
  • November 10, 1302
    Furthermore, we declare, we proclaim, we define that it is absolutely necessary for salvation that every human creature be subject to the Roman Pontiff.
  • July 19, 2008
    Dear friends in Christ, I think you would agree that the ecumenical movement has reached a critical juncture. We must guard against any temptation to view doctrine as divisive and hence an impediment to the seemingly more pressing and immediate task of improving the world in which we live.
  • January 1, 1985
    Resolved, the House of Deputies concurring, That the 68th General Convention […]
    2. declare that the text is a major contribution in the work toward reconciliation and visible unity which the World Council Commission on Faith and Order exists to foster;
    3. recognize in the text major elements of the faith of the Church through the ages, with certain reservations as expressed in this response of the Episcopal Church;
    4. encourage the Commission on Faith and Order in its work of evaluating the...
  • January 1, 1931
    1. Each Communion recognizes the catholicity and independence of the other and maintains its own.
    2. Each Communion agrees to admit members of the other Communion to participate in the Sacraments.
    3. Full Communion does not require from either Communion the acceptance of all doctrinal opinion, sacramental devotion or liturgical practice characteristic of the other, but implies that each believes the other to hold all the essentials of the Christian faith.
  • February 25, 1992
    The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod participates in ecumenical dialogues because it regards confession of the biblical Gospel and the effort to achieve agreement in the confession of the apostolic and catholic faith not as an optional matter but as a scriptural mandate. For the sake of the truth of the Gospel, the Synod therefore remains committed to doctrinal discussions that provide an occasion for identifying points of agreement and disagreement that exist between the partners in dialogue....
  • February 25, 1992
    We do not doubt that some differences between Roman Catholics and Lutherans may be attributed to contrasting "patterns of thought" or degrees of "emphasis." But this should not, and in fact cannot, hide the fact that fundamental doctrinal differences still exist between Roman Catholicism and Lutheranism on the doctrine of justification. While it may be possible to speak of a kind of "theological convergence," it is not possible in our view to speak of "doctrinal consensus," or "consensus in...
  • October 21, 2005
    The patient, relational work needed to build ecumenical links between Pentecostal and mainline Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox churches requires a massive undertaking of intentional outreach, prayer, mutual risk, and opportunities for building trust. This is an absolute imperative for ecumenism in the 21st Century. Yet, it is barely on our agenda. All too often, ecumenical bodies have been content to keep Pentecostals on the margins, relating to them with less intentionality and interest...
  • September 13, 2001
    We are outraged at reports of attacks on Arab Americans, Muslim Americans, and their mosques and businesses and condemn all such acts of lawlessness. Such attacks, such scapegoating, are deeply un-American. They also violate what is perhaps a preeminent lesson of Jewish history -- the danger of group hatred, of imputing to a group the actions of a few individuals.
  • July 13, 2004
    And so the Parliament has proven to me that people from different faith traditions can actually relate to one another, they can find common ground on the subterranean truths that run under those diverse traditions. And out of virtues like humility and respect, we can live in harmony. Not necessarily unity, but we can get closer to what Martin Luther King Jr., called the beloved community, the world house. The Parliament is a civil community, and in that, it is a microcosm of the future world...
  • September 1, 1893
    I am proud to belong to a religion which has taught the world both tolerance and universal acceptance. We believe not only in universal toleration, but we accept all religions as true. [...] I am proud to belong to a nation which has sheltered the persecuted and the refugees of all religions and all nations of the earth. I am proud to tell you that we have gathered in our bosom the purest remnant of the Israelites, who came to southern India and took refuge with us in the very year in which...
  • December 1, 1999
    It was not the intention of those who gathered in Cape Town to create a new religion, or to diminish in any way the precious uniqueness of any path. Instead, they come together to demonstrate that the religious and spiritual traditions and communities of Cape Town, of South Africa, and of the larger world can and should encounter one another in a spirit of respect, and with an openness to new understanding. They joined with one another in a spirit of dialogue and cooperation, seeking to...
  • May 12, 2009
    I assure you [the Chief Rabbis of Israel] of my desire to deepen mutual understanding and cooperation between the Holy See, the Chief Rabbinate of Israel and Jewish people throughout the world. [...] I am confident that our friendship will continue to set an example of trust in dialogue for Jews and Christians throughout the world. Looking at the accomplishments achieved thus far, and drawing our inspiration from the Holy Scriptures, we can confidently look forward to even stronger...
  • May 16, 2006
    Freedom of religion is a fundamental, inviolable and non-negotiable right of every human being in every country in the world. Freedom of religion connotes the freedom, without any obstruction, to practice one's own faith, freedom to propagate the teachings of one's faith to people of one's own and other faiths, and also the freedom to embrace another faith out of one's own free choice. We affirm that while everyone has a right to invite others to an understanding of their faith, it should not...
  • January 1, 2006
    From the Christian perspective, this [vision of mutual hospitality] has much to do with our ministry of reconciliation. It presupposes both our witness to the "other" about God in Christ and our openness to allow God to speak to us through the "other". Mission when understood in this light has no room for triumphalism; it contributes to removing the causes for religious animosity and the violence that often goes with it. Hospitality requires Christians to accept others as created in the image...
  • July 1, 2005
    The context of harmonious relationships allows for a wide range of opportunities for witness. Direct and clear evangelism,challenging people to reorient their lives radically, should be pursued. Dialogue also should have a prominent place. In today's ever-changing religious climate harmonious relationships can never be taken for granted but should be nurtured with great care.
  • We pledge our commitment to be loving friends and to stand against [anti-Semitism] in our generation. At the same time, we want to be transparent in affirming that we believe the most loving and Scriptural expression of our friendship toward Jewish people, and to anyone we call friend, is to forthrightly share the love of God in the person of Jesus Christ ... It is out of our profound respect for Jewish people that we seek to share the good news of Jesus Christ with them, and encourage others...
  • January 1, 1979
    In giving their witness [Christians] recognize that in most circumstances today the spirit of dialogue is necessary. For this reason we do not see dialogue and the giving of witness as standing in any contradiction to one another. Indeed, as Christians enter dialogue with their commitment to Jesus Christ, time and again the relationship of dialogue gives opportunity for authentic witness. Thus, to the member churches of the WCC we feel able with integrity to commend the way of dialogue as one...
  • January 1, 2004
    Among many religious communities, we come across people who seem to be primarily interested in the growth of their own community through various forms of mission including proselytism. They seem to have little interest in dialogue or may make use of it to further their missionary design. Such situations can be discouraging for people willing to engage in dialogue. Their disappointment often overshadows the possibility of identifying partners critical of those attitudes in their community. It...
  • December 7, 1965
    The right to religious freedom is exercised in human society: hence its exercise is subject to certain regulatory norms. In the use of all freedoms the moral principle of personal and social responsibility is to be observed. In the exercise of their rights, individual men and social groups are bound by the moral law to have respect both for the rights of others and for their own duties toward others and for the common welfare of all. Men are to deal with their fellows in justice and civility....
  • September 19, 1997
    While the word "proselyte" was originally used to designate a person who became a member of the Jewish community by believing in Yahweh and respecting the Law of Moses, and subsequently, in early Christian times, for a person of another faith who converted to Christianity ... "Proselytism" is now used to mean the encouragement of Christians who belong to a church to change their denominational allegiance, through ways and means that "contradict the spirit of Christian love, violate the...
  • January 1, 1997
    All Christians have the right to bear witness to the Gospel before all people, including other Christians. Such witness may legitimately involve the persuasive proclamation of the Gospel in such a way as to bring people to faith in Jesus Christ or to commit themselves more deeply to Him within the context of their own church. The legitimate proclamation of the Gospel will bear the marks of Christian love (cf. 1 Cor 13). It will never seek its own selfish ends by using the opportunity to speak...
  • January 1, 1997
    Confusion has resulted when the terms "proselytism" and "evangelism" have been used as though they were synonyms. This confusion has impacted the civil realm. Some countries, for instance, have passed so-called "anti-proselytism" laws which prohibit or greatly restrict any kind of Christian evangelism or missionary activity. We deplore this. Mention of these anti-proselytism laws introduces us to the complex matter of religious freedom. There is general agreement that religious liberty is a...
  • September 25, 1995
    In the history of the Church, the term "proselytism" has been used as a positive term and even as an equivalent concept for missionary activity. More recently, especially in the context of the modern ecumenical movement, it has taken on a negative connotation when applied to activities of Christians to win adherents from other Christian communities ... They may be for unworthy motives or by unjust means that violate the conscience of the human person; or even if proceeding with good...
  • September 2, 1993
    The church wants particularly to dialogue with those men and women who adore the one and Almighty God ... The choice of dialogue is not optional. The position of the council is extremely clear. Every religion has aspects of goodness and truth.
  • September 1, 1893
    But if there is ever to be a universal religion, it must be one which will hold no location in place or time; which will be infinite, like the God it will preach; whose Sun shines upon the followers of Krishna or Christ, saints or sinners, alike; which will not be the Brahman or Buddhist, Christian or Mohammedan, but the sum total of all these, and still have infinite space for development; which in its Catholicity will embrace in its infinite arms and find a place for every human being [...]...
  • September 1, 1893
    All religions apply more or less the causal law in the sphere of human conduct, and remark that the pleasure and happiness of one's future life depend on the purity of his present life. But what is peculiar to Buddhism is, it applies the law not only to the relation of present and future life, but also past and present. [...] Bodily health, material wealth, wonderful genius, unnatural suffering are the infallible expressions of the law of causality which governs every particle of the...
  • September 4, 1993
    Possessed of reason and conscience, every human is obliged to behave in a genuinely human fashion, to do good and avoid evil! It is the intention of this Global Ethic to clarify what this means. [...] There is a principle which is found and has persisted in many religious and ethical traditions of humankind for thousands of years: What you do not wish done to yourself, do not do to others. Or in positive terms: What you wish done to yourself, do to others! This should be the irrevocable,...
  • September 4, 1993
    Our world is experiencing a fundamental crisis: A crisis in global economy, global ecology, and global politics. The lack of a grand vision, the tangle of unresolved problems, political paralysis, mediocre political leadership with little insight or foresight, and in general too little sense for the commonweal are seen everywhere. [...] We condemn these blights and declare that they need not be. An ethic already exists within the religious teachings of the world which can counter the global...
  • September 4, 1993
    We must accept the existence of different religions. Spiritual harmony is essential. The next question: is it possible? My answer is definitely yes, yes, yes.
  • December 1, 1999
    Tragically, religion sometimes seemed to have lost its ability to hold people to good values and to inspire in them those articles and approaches that transcend the narrow and immediate considerations. Religious leaders, institutions and adherents now once more need to draw upon those critical resources that have made it such a central part of human life throughout the ages. Few other dimensions of human life reach such a massive following as the religious. Its roots are in every nook and...
  • December 8, 1999
    Change only takes place through action. Frankly speaking, not through prayer or meditation, but through action.
  • July 13, 2004
    My faith tradition tells me that to have a "tolerant" society is to demean society. If I say that I will tolerate you, I am demeaning you. If I say that I will accept you, I am still demeaning you. Now if I was to say, "I will respect you," that would be slightly better. But what if I said, "I will lay down my life for you!"? You have to try and have that kind of spirit of sacrifice.
  • November 27, 2005
    Globalisation is bringing our countries and peoples closer together. Technology, communication, migration and tourism have made us more aware of developments in other countries and regions. We need to enhance the dialogue between cultures and religions. It has become even more urgent. It must of course be based on mutual respect and understanding. We must counter prejudice and misconceptions through a frank and open dialogue. Only extremists will benefit from a distorted image of developments...
  • October 13, 2009
    The Christian story lays out a model of reconnection with an alienated world: it tells us of a material human life inhabited by God and raised transfigured from death; of a sharing of material food which makes us sharers in eternal life; of a community whose life together seeks to express within creation the care of the creator. In the words used by both Moses and St Paul, this is not a message remote from us in heaven or buried under the earth: it is near, on our lips and hearts (Rom.10.6-9,...
  • November 3, 2009
    In the book of Revelation, great multitudes, from all nations and kindreds, people and tongues, stand before the throne and cry out Salvation/deliverance belongs to God. Too often we have seen salvation exclusively in terms of individuals. That is of course vital but the Bible shows us the individual person realistically as someone always involved in relationships with other human beings and with the world of nature. We can perish in a world and a human community that is atomised but we are...
  • November 3, 2009
    It is a pivotal moment for our world. Copenhagen provides a unique opportunity. If we tackle climate change properly we can advance many other of our goals as well. Green growth can make inroads against global poverty. We can lay a foundation for peace and security for generations to come. We can define a more sustainable relationship with our planet. It is an inter-generational issue and it is a moral issue. That is why the voices and deeds and the teachings of you, the worlds faith groups,...
  • November 3, 2009
    I am very grateful for your strong commitment to preserve our environment to preserve our home, only home. We have only one common home. I have long believed that when government, civil society and, particularly, religious communities work towards a common goal, transformational change can take place. Faiths and religions are a central part of that equation. Indeed the worlds faith communities occupy a unique position in discussions on the fate of our planet and accelerating impacts of...
  • November 1, 2012
    If we limit the measure [of religious diversity] to different world religions, our largest cities and the two coasts are the most diverse. These are the areas where other cultures traditionally arrive first, so it is not surprising that other religions show up stronger here. The million-plus metro with the highest Simpson Index of Diversity is New York, NY-NJ-PA. If we broadly define some religious groupings often recognized in the United States, the West has the strongest diversity index,...
  • October 21, 2005
    [... W]e seem tempted to be content with an ecumenism defined externally by repeated prophetic utterance, and internally by perpetual institutional malaise. Ecumenism in this, the 21st Century must find fresh forms of expression, new avenues to overcome divisions, and inspiring vision that spiritually engages the churches and its members in this calling. [...] One of the ironies, in fact, is that our ecumenical institutions today spend considerable effort analyzing the global trends shaping...