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Religionandglobaldevelopment

HIV/AIDS

Religion and Development Database

Publications (84)

The ferocity of the HIV/AIDS pandemic has drawn many religious leaders and groups—inspired by insight, compassion, or the practical realities around them—to respond. Many faiths unite in the cause to protect the dignity of those affected and to promote HIV/AIDS as a human rights issue. The epidemic is highly correlated with poverty, gender inequality, and weak public services. Not only is it often a sign of underdevelopment, but it also serves to perpetuate it through its enormous human cost as well as the cost of drugs, treatments, and discrimination. Many faith-based actors from diverse traditions, therefore, have made HIV/AIDS a cornerstone of their development work. These organizations provide support networks, testing, access to treatments, and educational programs to combat the devastating effects of the disease. While many Catholic organizations are engaged in HIV/AIDS relief efforts, there is controversy over the Catholic Church’s stance against the use of condoms as a form of disease prevention. Despite this, interfaith groups are actively involved in the issue, often collaborating with international bodies such as UNAIDS and WHO. However, better coordination between secular humanitarian actors and faith-based organizations is needed to improve the effectiveness of these efforts. The resources on this page offer an overview of the faith-inspired organizations, events, and publications related to ongoing HIV/AIDS relief work around the globe. The resources are part of an ongoing initiative focused on religion and global development sponsored by the Luce Foundation.


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  • December 1, 2011
    This UNAIDS document provides guidance for increasing partnerships with civil societies, including people living with HIV. The document calls for meaningful engagement with civil societies, including faith-based organizations, in all areas of the UN Joint Program on HIV/AIDS’s work to meet the strategic targets and HIV/AIDS elimination commitments agreed in the 2011 Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS. This guidance document is designed to help key stakeholders and decision-makers take concrete...
  • January 1, 2011
    This Malaysian AIDS Council report calls for greater involvement of religious authorities to enhance the roles played by the public health sector and grassroots organizations in addressing issues faced by people living with HIV in Malaysia. Recognizing the low level of engagement of Islamic religious authorities in community-based responses to HIV and AIDS, this report aims to educate religious leaders and increase political leadership among Muslim leaders to address issues related to...
  • May 1, 2010
    This Overseas Development Institute’s policy brief draws on lessons learned in the Democratic Republic of Congo, South Sudan, and Kenya to suggest that greater collaboration between humanitarian actors and faith-based communities (FBCs) needs to occur in order to build emergency capcity in HIV services. The briefing argues that since FBCs have greater access to local people in a crisis and continue to provide HIV-related services during crisis situations, humanitarian agencies need to help...
  • April 17, 2010
    This position paper by the Pan-African Christian AIDS Network comments on the role of church and family in strengthening responses to the AIDS epidemic. It begins by affirming the importance of family in the midst of crisis and outlining the different ways HIV/AIDS strains family relationships. It then discusses the unique advantage churches have for responding to HIV/AIDS and particularly in terms of strengthening families. It concludes with a list of specific actions churches ought to take...
  • April 2, 2010
    After the March 2010 Summit of High Level Religious Leaders convened in the Netherlands to address responses to HIV and AIDS, the fourteenth Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso, released this open letter praising the faith leaders who attended. The message of the Dalai Lama urges faith leaders to avoid complacency and continue their collective action on the still-prevalent conditions of HIV/AIDS infection. He appeals to compassion and understanding as important aspects of healing, calling human...
  • January 1, 2010
    This publication reports on the Global Fund's partnership with faith-based organizations (FBOs) in the fight against HIV/AIDS and malaria. The Global Fund recognizes the important role FBOs play in providing rural health care and orphan care in the developing world, especially in serving the poorest and most vulnerable populations. Therefore, the Global Fund has made FBOs a priority for receiving grants and funding for projects. This report documents the work that partnering FBOs have...
  • January 1, 2010
    Commissioned by Tearfund, this report explores how local faith-based responses to HIV strengthen health systems in Africa. Using desk review, semi-structured interviews, and focus group discussions with personnel and stakeholders from Christian development organizations in Malawi and Chad, researchers found that not only can FBOs educate and influence a wide swath of hard-to-reach populations, interfaith efforts can also cut across traditional barriers to deliver HIV services to all. FBOs'...
  • January 1, 2010
    Drawing upon a wide literature on HIV, religion, and advocacy, this toolkit aims to equip and inspire people to use the strength of their faith communities to advocate for the achievement of universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care, and support. It contains a background on faith-based advocacy and HIV, a guide to planning advocacy campaigns, an overview of universal access, and additional advocacy resources. The toolkit was prepared as part of the Ecumenical Advocacy Alliance's HIV...
  • December 1, 2009
    The report "Partnership with Faith-Based Organizations: UNAIDS Strategic Framework" draws on an 18-month consultation process to detail a new framework for cooperative interaction between UNAIDS and FBOs in support of the global goal of universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care, and support. The report begins by clarifying the terms of discussion and highlighting the crucial role FBOs play in providing HIV-related health services. It acknowledges mistrust of the other on both sides...
  • August 1, 2009
    This report summarizes the USAID Health Policy Initiative on "The Role of Religious Communities in Addressing Gender-based Violence and HIV," designed to prevent and reduce gender-based violence and HIV among women and girls by improving the capacity of religious leaders and faith-based organizations to respond to gender-based violence and its links to HIV. This report shows that the project has increased engagement and commitment from religious leaders, established multi-faith women’s...
  • January 1, 2009
    Based on a study commissioned by Tearfund and UNAIDS, this report describes the possibilities and challenges of collaborative relationships between Christian organizations, national governments, donors, and other faith-based organizations in the struggle against HIV/AIDS in Africa. The report focuses on the framework of the “Three Ones” policy, which calls for one agreed action framework, one national coordinating authority, and one monitoring and evaluating system. The report finds that lack...
  • August 16, 2007
    The UNDP HIV/AIDS Regional Programme in the Arab States (HARPAS) outlines objectives and methods for its Religious Leaders & HIV/AIDS Initiative, a program to enroll and mobilize religious leaders and promote interfaith dialogue in the fight against HIV/AIDS in the Arab region. It asserts that dialogue at its core is not found in theological debates or compliments, but rather in solidarity and commitment in the face of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Since 2004, HARPAS has hosted seven regional and...
  • August 16, 2007
    This is a pamphlet from the All African Anglican Conference on HIV/AIDS featuring hymns and prayers from the closing religious ceremonies. The final Eucharist of the conference took place on Thursday, August 16, 2007, with a theme of "United In Jesus We Embrace All Who Live With HIV/AIDS in Africa." The pamphlet includes the liturgy for use during the procession, reflection and lighting of the HIV/AIDS candle, penitence, readings from Luke 10:25-37, and communion.
  • July 1, 2007
    Prepared for the UK Consortium on AIDS and International Development and distributed by the Tearfund International Learning Zone, this report examines the extent to which the UK Department for International Development (DFID) has fulfilled the commitment to working with faith-based organizations (FBOs) that it made in its 2004 Taking Action statement. "DFID, Faith and AIDS: A Review for the Update of Taking Action" highlights the unique contributions to HIV/AIDS response made by FBOs and...
  • February 12, 2007
    Prepared by the Development Dialogue on Values and Ethics Unit at the World Bank, this report assesses the role of faith leaders and institutions in Mozambique in dealing with HIV/AIDS. It identifies the strong role that faith leaders and organizations play in Mozambican society and argues that greater cooperation is needed if HIV/AIDS is to be properly addressed. The paper examines the current response in Mozambique to HIV/AIDS, existing faith institutions, and steps for future action.
  • February 1, 2007
    "Appreciating Assets: The Contribution of Religion to Universal Access in Africa" reports on the importance of partnerships with faith-based organizations in sub-Saharan Africa. It focuses on data collected from Zambia and Lesotho on the prevalence and community perception of FBOs working with HIV/AIDS patients. It ultimately offers advice to public health and religious leaders in their fight against HIV/AIDS. The report was produced by the African Religious Health Assets Program (ARHAP)...
  • January 1, 2007
    This research study performed by Samuel MacMaster, et al., investigates the effectiveness of a faith-based program in reducing substance abuse, a behavior which increases the risk of HIV/AIDS. The study evaluates a federally funded faith-based program that targets the issue among African-Americans in Nashville, Tennessee. It finds that the program's emphasis on spirituality was relatively successful in reducing the risky behavior of African-American substance abusers. Researchers note the...
  • January 1, 2007
    In light of the findings of the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS 2004 epidemic report, in this article authors Shari Dworkin and Anke Ehrhardt critically examine the "abstinence, be faithful, condom use" (ABC) strategic approach to HIV/AIDS given the feminization of the disease. The authors assess the limitations of the ABC approach, arguing in favor of including "gender, economics, and migration" (GEM) to serve as a comprehensive prevention response. They argue that the addition of...
  • November 7, 2006
    The Joint Declaration of the International Catholic-Jewish Liaison Committee summarizes the committee's nineteenth meeting in Cape Town, South Africa, which used the theme "Dignifying the Divine Image" to explore beliefs about healthcare and the HIV/AIDS pandemic. It first highlights the fortieth anniversary of Nostra Aetate and celebrates the progress in dialogue made in the years since that time. Focusing on those affected by HIV/AIDS, the declaration admits continuing disagreement over...
  • July 31, 2006
    Sponsored by Tearfund, this briefing paper outlines the potential opportunities and challenges for collaboration between traditional international development agencies (IDAs) and Christian churches in Africa, especially in AIDS prevention, education, and treatment work. Tearfund emphasizes that FBOs are not just a subset of NGOs, but rather that their faith character gives them unique qualities. Community-based FBOs often feel that this uniqueness, along with their long-term commitment to the...
  • July 19, 2006
    In this address delivered at the 2006 Interfaith Summit on Africa, Church of God in Christ Bishop Charles E. Blake, Sr., discusses faith-based solutions to social justice issues in Africa, namely poverty and HIV/AIDS. In 2001, he co-founded the Pan African Children's Fund, also called Save Africa's Children (PACF/SAC), to assist faith-based institutions in serving orphans in sub-Saharan Africa. Supported by the United Nations Children's Fund and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS,...
  • July 1, 2006
    In this report the Firelight Foundation, a support organization for HIV-positive children in Sub-Saharan Africa, provides information on faith-based programs and strategies to assist children and families affected by HIV/AIDS in the region and advocates greater funding for family- and community-based programs. The report has been supported and endorsed by UNICEF, American Jewish World Service, the Bernard van Leer Foundation, Save Africa's Children/Pan African Children's Fund, Better Care...
  • March 31, 2006
    In an article published by the African Jesuit AIDS Network (AJAN), Michael Czerny, S.J., discusses the comparative benefits of anti-retroviral (ARV) drugs versus community education programs in fighting HIV/AIDS. He incorporates both African and Western perspectives and invokes supporting examples of Catholic Church-led programs. Czerny posits that while ARVs are an important component of the struggle against HIV/AIDS, overemphasis on this method of treatment risks drawing valuable attention...
  • March 31, 2006
    Michael Kelly, a Jesuit priest living in Zambia, suggests a more dynamic framework for approaching the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS. He argues that the continuation of the pandemic is rooted in oppressive human structures linking poverty, gender disparities, stigma, discrimination, and global socio-economic disparities. He criticizes two models of responding to the disease: the biomedical, pharmaceutical model and the behavioral model. He instead advocates an approach focusing on the...
  • March 25, 2006
    In the March 25, 2006 edition of The Lancet, Shereen El Feki details the slowly dawning awareness in the Middle East and North Africa that HIV/AIDS is a serious problem that requires a concerted response. El Feki describes some of the education, prevention, treatment, and stigma reduction initiatives being carried out throughout the region by Muslim and Christian leaders from across the Arab region. She also notes the diversity of attitudes and level of response from country to country,...
  • March 1, 2006
    Originally published in the Bulletin of the Jesuit Centre for Theological Reflection, this pamphlet brings together essays about AIDS in Zambia by Michael J. Kelly, SJ. "Faith and AIDS in Zambia" offers a holistic view of the epidemic, its causes and consequences, and a series of socio-economic and religious responses to its challenges. Father Kelly is a Jesuit priest, Zambian citizen, educator, researcher, and activist on HIV/AIDS. His work is based on his experiences living in Zambia for...
  • February 1, 2006
    This report describes the findings of a 2003 multi-country study conducted by the Ecumenical Pharmaceutical Network (EPN) and the World Health Organization of 16 EPN-member faith-based drug-supply organizations (DSOs) and their contribution to supplying medicines in 11 sub-Saharan African countries. Utilizing assessment questionnaires, the study focused on assessments of these organizations’ supply, storage, and distribution systems. The results affirm that faith-based DSOs are generally...
  • January 1, 2006
    In this document, the World Council of Churches (WCC) urges its members to continue to fight the global HIV/AIDS epidemic. The paper includes a description of the current HIV/AIDS situation, an affirmation of the church's renewed commitment to combat the epidemic and to care for those affected by the disease, a list of objectives, and a place for members to formalize their commitment by signing the document. The WCC presented this paper at its Ninth Assembly in Porto Alegre, Brazil, in 2006.
  • January 1, 2006
    This report was produced by the UNDP HIV/AIDS Regional Programme in the Arab States in conjunction with the League of Arab States and provides detailed information about the socioeconomic status of the Arab region. It is part of the Regional Programme's efforts to heighten awareness and build commitment to scale up prevention measures to the spread of HIV/AIDS in the region. In addition, the report provides commentary on Islam's role in shaping the response to HIV/AIDS, including a...
  • December 3, 2005
    In a plenary session of partnerships at the December 2005 Abuja pre-International Conference on AIDS and STDs in Africa (ICASA), Katherine Marshall explores the partnership between faith-based organizations and the World Bank in development work and the fight against HIV/AIDS. This document reviews the multi-faceted roles of faith institutions in confronting the pandemic, looking at the framework for partnerships between faith institutions and development organizations. In reviewing the...
  • December 1, 2005
    Tomoko Kubotani and David Engstrom detail a study that explores Buddhist temple-based HIV/AIDS treatment in this Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare article. The research is based on interviews from monks administering this care and the people living with HIV/AID (PLWHA) that seek treatment at temples in Thailand. Describing the services provided by three temples that focus their health services on caring for PLWHA, the article centers around three major themes concerning the role of...
  • November 17, 2005
    In this publication, the World Bank explores the mutually reinforcing relationship between HIV/AIDS and conflict in Africa, calling for faith-based organizations to ensure HIV/AIDS relief and prevention are included in programs serving war-affected populations. It discusses the challenges of preventing mother-to-child transmission in refugee camps and the absence of prevention and counseling services for refugees and internally displaced people. The article argues that since faith-based...
  • July 1, 2005
    In this article, Laura Kelley and Nicholas Eberstadt highlight the inadequate information on most epidemics in the Muslim world and look for clues within Islam that contribute to the slow response to HIV/AIDS. Specifically, Kelly and Eberstadt argue that no clear separation between church and state and the lack of democracy are the main reasons for government inaction. Furthermore, the authors connect the assumption that sexual activities linked to HIV/AIDS do not occur in the Muslim World...
  • June 1, 2005
    In this paper published by the National Bureau of Asian Research, Laura M. Kelley and Nicholas Eberstadt discuss the extent to which the HIV/AIDS pandemic has affected the Muslim world and describe the policy implications of these findings. The authors criticize governments' hesitation to accept the urgency of the crisis, which they attribute to their unwillingness to accept that behaviors associated with the spread of HIV/AIDS, including premarital sex and intravenous drug use, take place in...
  • March 29, 2005
    Published by Human Rights Watch in 2005, this report examines and addresses the shift of policy in Uganda from effective and scientifically proven HIV prevention strategies to ideological approaches that focus solely on abstinence. A major factor in this strategic shift has been the influence of important religious leaders in the community. The document includes a series of recommendations to the government in Uganda, the US Congress, the Presidential Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)...
  • February 9, 2005
    This report from the Ecumenical Pharmaceutical Network details the results of research conducted in the summer of 2004 regarding access to and understanding of anti-retroviral drugs in Kenya. The results were presented to a group of 42 representatives from churches, church health services, NGOs, and government organizations. A key finding of the research is the need for increased cooperation and sharing of practices between the church and the church health service community in Kenya. Noted...
  • January 1, 2005
    In "Buddhism, the Status of Women and the Spread of HIV/AIDS in Thailand," Areewan Klunklin and Jennifer Greenwood argue that the spread of HIV/AIDS in Thailand can be primarily attributed to the inferior status of women as a result of religious and societal norms. The article examines the impact of Buddhist religious tenets and Thai culture on high-risk sexual behavior and HIV prevention, evaluating the expression of Buddhist folklore and Thai misogyny in differing gender roles of males and...
  • January 1, 2005
    This study compares the knowledge levels and prevention behaviors of men and women in mainline and charismatic churches in Mozambique. It finds that a gender gap—more pronounced within the healing churches than the mainline congregations—exists despite the presence of the same prevention rhetoric. The author attributes this discrepancy to the relatively high status of HIV/AIDS educators within mainline churches, the economies of scale of bringing education programs to larger mainline...
  • January 1, 2005
    This Positive Muslims publication, calling upon values of justice and compassion, presents an overview for Muslim understanding and response to HIV and AIDS. The document is designed for teachers in religious institutions, local community leaders, organizations that work with Muslims on HIV/AIDS, with women, or with young people. It explores dominant Muslim viewpoints on the disease and the broader issues of HIV/AIDS and justice before outlining a framework for new responses. The publication...
  • January 1, 2005
    "HIV/AIDS, Stigma, and Faith-Based Organizations" deconstructs the shades of meaning for terms surrounding HIV/AIDS like discrimination and stigma, outlining how FBOs have been part of the problem and how they are becoming part of the solution. Authors Warren Parker and Karen Birdsall argue that HIV/AIDS stigma has been over-elaborated relative to other forms of stigma and that its pervasiveness in African communities has been overstated; they further discuss the dangers of generalizing from...
  • January 1, 2005
    In this report, the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) investigates the status of children living in the Islamic World. The report focuses on health, education, child protection, and HIV/AIDS. It is written within the context of larger Millennium Development Goals and a commitment to "A World Fit for Children." The report explores whether or not the global community is meeting its commitment to children in the Islamic World and also provides statistical tables and information on various...
  • November 30, 2004
    This case study analyzes the Community of Sant'Egidio's Drug Resources Enhancement Against AIDS and Malnutrition (DREAM) program, an integrated faith-based initiative combining varieties of medical treatment with health education in an effort to treat HIV/AIDS in Mozambique. It highlights the work of DREAM in conducting its highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) program, detailing DREAM's holistic philosophy in addressing malnutrition, tuberculosis, malaria, and sexually transmitted...
  • November 30, 2004
    The Global Health Council analyzes the role and scope of faith-based organizations as part of the global response to HIV/AIDS through interviews with key decision makers in six countries. Commissioned by the Catholic Medical Mission Board, the study attempted to select countries representing a variety of regions, stages of the epidemic, and religious traditions. The report concludes that FBOs are successful in mitigating the negative effects of HIV/AIDS, empowering vulnerable groups, and...
  • November 30, 2004
    Published by the Centre for AIDS Development, Research and Evaluation (CADRE), this paper analyzes the efforts of faith-based organizations to provide HIV/AIDS relief and prevention services in South Africa. Research on HIV/AIDS in South Africa has traditionally focused on the strategies of national and provincial governments to fight the epidemic. Less attention has been given to the work of non-governmental and community organizations, including faith-based organizations. This report aims...
  • September 5, 2004
    In her speech at a Community of Sant'Egidio International Meeting, Katherine Marshall discusses the HIV/AIDS crisis in Africa. Her remarks focus on the development dimensions of the epidemic, examining issues around gender, prevention, treatment, and the importance of public, private, and civil society partnerships. Through case studies of Senegal, Thailand, and Uganda, Marshall emphasizes the need for multi-sector alliances, dialogue across cultures, and the cooperation of a diversity of...
  • May 25, 2004
    "Conquering Slim: Uganda's War on HIV/AIDS" explores the critical role of religious leaders and faith-based organizations in supporting Uganda's ABC (Abstinence, Be faithful, use a Condom) prevention strategy, education efforts, and anti-stigma initiatives, along with the challenges in sustaining this positive momentum in years to come. It also stresses how cooperation among diverse partners (including faith groups) and the integration of multiple initiatives was crucial to Uganda's success....
  • March 1, 2004
    This paper describes the shortcomings of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSP) process and product with regards to HIV/AIDS. The United Kingdom has made HIV/AIDS and Africa as one of its top priorities, but the relationship between the UK Department for International Health (DFID) and PRSP challenges its efforts. Tearfund criticizes both the lack of deep inclusion of all sectors of society (including people affected by AIDS) in the PRSP formulation process, as well as the (neoliberal,...
  • March 1, 2004
    The Tearfund HIV/AIDS briefing paper "Reaching Out?" introduces various donor initiatives targeted at FBOs that work on HIV/AIDS, explaining the limitations of these partnerships and barriers to increasing support. Primarily focusing on Christian FBOs, the paper analyzes responses of donors to FBOs and makes recommendations for improved collaboration. The paper argues that while the particular strengths of FBOs have been acknowledged, the amount of financial and technical support they receive...
  • January 1, 2004
    In "'I Told Them Not to Love One Another!': Gender, Christianity and the Role of Adult Education in the Ugandan Response to HIV/AIDS," Marc Fiedrich discusses the inconsistent quality of adult education classes and training of educators in Uganda as a challenge to NGO efforts to promote disease prevention education. Addressing the source of this problem, he examines the moral boundaries rather than the barriers that HIV/AIDS education poses, including sex discrimination against women and...
  • January 1, 2004
    In Breaking the Conspiracy of Silence: Christian Churches and the Global AIDS Crisis, Donald Messer offers a monograph in practical theology to motivate and inspire Christians to put the HIV/AIDS crisis at the top of their priority list. He argues that churches in the United States, particularly the United Methodist Church, have done little for HIV/AIDS prevention and care. Providing statistics about the epidemic from across the world, he illustrates the effect that religious denominations...
  • January 1, 2004
    This joint report issued by UNICEF and the World Conference of Religions for Peace discusses the efficacy of faith-based organizations in mitigating the effects of HIV/AIDS on orphans and vulnerable children (OVC). A study of six Sub-Saharan African countries found that the independent, community-based work of small congregations and organizations represented a significant portion of OVC care programming, despite the relatively small scale of each individual initiative. Increasing...
  • November 1, 2003
    This UNICEF document, a result of the June 2002 African Religious Leaders’ Assembly on Children and HIV/AIDS, was produced in partnership with the World Conference of Religions for Peace to advocate for the involvement of religious leaders and organizations in the fight to stop the spread of HIV/AIDS. Discussing tools and resources which community and faith-based leaders can utilize, it offers advice on how African and Asian communities can implement change. "What Religious Leaders Can Do...
  • May 8, 2003
    This Integrated Regional Information Networks interview with Ethiopian Orthodox Patriarch Abune Paulos highlights the church's efforts to combat HIV/AIDS. At the time Paulos led approximately 40 million followers of the Orthodox Tewahedo Church in Ethiopia. He describes the church's efforts to address stigma and behavioral change, its stance on the use of condoms, its predicted reaction if a priest was found to be HIV-positive, and its response to criticisms that the church supports the use...
  • March 3, 2003
    Presented to the UN Commission on the Status of Women, the report discusses the impact of the HIV/AIDS pandemic on development and human rights in Africa with particular concern for the condition of women. It offers recommendations for improving the situation of women worldwide and for fighting HIV/AIDS; it also highlights the distinct strengths of faith communities in meeting these challenges. This document was prepared by the African Women of Faith Network which formed under the World...
  • February 28, 2003
    Following their Latin America Regional Consultation, members of the Lutheran World Federation (LWF) issued this action plan to combat the spread of HIV/AIDS in Latin America. The statement was a response to and a contextualization of LWF's "Compassion, Conversion, Care: Responding as churches to the HIV/AIDS pandemic — An Action Plan of the Lutheran World Federation." The action plan describes the church's motivation to protect human dignity and delineates local, national, and regional...
  • February 28, 2003
    This March 2003 newsletter of the Islamic Medical Association of Uganda features articles on HIV/AIDS. It outlines initiatives relating to the "Community Action to Protect Children from HIV/AIDS" project, implemented in the Kawempe, Makindye, and Rubaga divisions of the Kampala District in Uganda. Initiatives include preventing mother-to-child transmission, addressing stigma and discrimination, approaching HIV prevention from the Muslim perspective, and following guidelines for Muslim...
  • January 1, 2003
    This Catholics for a Free Choice report affirms that the Platform for Action, a product of the United Nations' Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing in 1995, resonates with Catholic social teachings on economic justice and human rights. The report provides information for Catholics who are at risk for HIV/AIDS and struggling with questions of faith and the use of condoms for HIV/AIDS protection. It also makes policy recommendations for both the Catholic Church and society at large on...
  • November 30, 2002
    The 2002 Annual Report of the Catholic Medical Mission Board highlights the organization's successes, including the allocation of nearly $100 million and the start of an ambitious initiative, "Born to Live," which is aimed at the prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission. It also contains several extended testimonials that illustrate the impact of the association's programs. It continues with an illustrated timeline of its activities over the previous 75 years and concludes with...
  • October 14, 2002
    In this press release, the Catholic Medical Mission Board (CMMB) and the Kenya Episcopal Conference (KEC) announce their joint initiative "Born to Live," designed to fight mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Kenya. The memorandum, signed by CMMB and KEC, enables CMMB to implement its prevention of mother-to-child transmission program into 41 hospitals, 94 health centers, and 276 dispensaries. Members express their belief that this faith-based partnership will significantly reduce HIV/AIDS...
  • October 1, 2002
    In this paper for the Health Economics and HIV/AIDS Research Division of the University of Natal, Jeremy Liebowitz argues that faith-based organizations have inherent advantages in organizing and delivering intervention strategies to combat HIV/AIDS. Utilizing a case study of Uganda, Liebowitz reviews the role of FBOs in delivering information, encouraging open discussion, providing services, and changing behavior within their communities. Paying particular attention to rural areas, he...
  • October 1, 2002
    This article by Peter Okaalet, senior director of the Health, HIV, and AIDS Policy Office at MAP International, provides an overview of the advantages of faith-based responses to HIV/AIDS. Okaalet posits that religious-based initiatives, when properly supported and coordinated, can be some of the most strategic vehicles through which to slow the spread of HIV and AIDS. The article describes the position of the church regarding HIV/AIDS and proactive potentials for taking advantage of this...
  • September 6, 2002
    In her speech to the International Meeting of the Community of Sant'Egidio, Katherine Marshall focuses on the special challenges of globalization today, namely poverty, HIV/AIDS, and inequality in education. She discusses the challenges of global citizenship, the salience of poverty and social justice in the modern world, and threats and opportunities for daily citizens. She believes that something must be done to address the stark differences between the world of abundance and opportunity...
  • September 1, 2002
    This United States Agency for International Development (USAID) report synthesizes presentations made in February 2002 at USAID by four individuals with long-term experience in HIV prevention in Africa. "What Happened in Uganda? Declining HIV Prevalence, Behavior Change, and the National Response" provides statistical data relating to a variety of interventions that have resulted in a decline in incidence and prevalence of HIV, paying particular attention to population-based and gender-based...
  • August 26, 2002
    This document is an outline of a project led by Medical Assistance Program International (MAP) to mobilize both Protestant and Catholic churches in Kenya to get involved in HIV/AIDS prevention. The project attempts to capitalize on the appeal of churches across ethnic, gender, age, economic, and social lines to reduce high-risk sexual behavior. It encourages the expansion of local, church-led HIV/AIDS programs. At the time of writing two major policy statements on HIV/AIDS have been...
  • July 1, 2002
    Journeys of Faith describes and analyzes innovative HIV/AIDS programs carried out by churches and other Christian organizations in Mozambique, Namibia, and South Africa. Written by Canon Gideon Byamugisha, Lucy Y. Steinitz, Glen Williams, and Phumzile Zondi, this book is the sixteenth in the Strategies for Hope Series, which argues for the importance of religious institutions in promoting good health. Journeys of Faith is narrative in nature, explaining how religious faith bolstered the...
  • June 12, 2002
    This final declaration from the African Religious Leaders Assembly on Children and HIV/AIDS calls for a partnership between religious organizations, governmental leaders, and non-governmental sectors to care for children affected by HIV/AIDS and to reduce the stigma associated with the disease. It outlines a commitment to defend children with HIV/AIDS against social stigma, to increase educational efforts, and to improve access to medical care and information. The report also pledges to...
  • November 30, 2001
    This brochure highlights the work of the Islamic Medical Association of Uganda, particularly in HIV/AIDS prevention. It outlines eight health projects, implementation of a training program at Saidina A Bubakar Nursing Home, and construction of Saidina A Bubakar Hospital and Training Center. The Islamic Medical Association targets all Ugandans but gives particular attention to Muslim communities. It consists of 350 health professionals and partners with agencies such as USAID, UNICEF, UNDP,...
  • November 30, 2001
    In this factsheet, POLICY Project highlights its work with faith-based organizations fighting HIV/AIDS. Partnering with the (Anglican) Church Province of Southern Africa, POLICY works to incorporate new organizations into existing networks of FBOs fighting HIV/AIDS. The factsheet describes examples of initiatives in Cambodia, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda. Programs include technical assistance, small grants, mentoring, capacity development, awareness raising and training...
  • November 25, 2001
    "Plan of Action: The Ecumenical Response to HIV/AIDS in Africa" recognizes the failure of African churches in side-stepping issues of sexuality and contributing to the stigmatization of the sick. It highlights the theological basis for compassion and concerted action; the destructive impact of early inaction and ambivalence towards HIV/AIDS; the unique strengths and resources that churches bring to bear; and a plan for church engagement in the fight against stigma, discrimination, and the...
  • June 25, 2001
    This publication is a country report of the HIV/AIDS situation in Indonesia. Published as part of the United Nations General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS, it highlights multisectoral approaches to combat the virus. Programmes include IEC (Information, Education, Communication), prevention, testing and counseling, treatment and care, education and training, research and development, monitoring and evaluation, international cooperation, and laws and regulation. This multidimensional...
  • June 25, 2001
    In this statement to the UN Special General Assembly on HIV/AIDS, facilitated by the World Council of Churches, Christian, Jewish, and interfaith organizations discuss the strengths of FBOs and the potential for partnership with secular institutions. They first acknowledge past shortcomings of faith-based organizations in addressing the epidemic, and then highlight successes and innovations that religious actors have developed. By reaffirming their commitment to support all efforts already...
  • May 31, 2001
    The statement "HIV/AIDS & Gender Equality: Transforming Attitudes and Behaviors" outlines the Baha'i perspective on critical issues surrounding the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Gender inequality, stigma, and the role of faith communities in mitigating both of these are the main focus. The Baha'i view is that as interaction between people of different faiths and cultures increases, the traditions and practices that discriminate against women will gradually give way; only spiritual transformation can...
  • May 25, 2001
    In "The Impact of Religious Organizations in Promoting HIV/AIDS prevention," Edward C. Green of Synergy Project and the Harvard School of Public Health discusses primary behavior change and the involvement of religious leaders and organizations in HIV/AIDS initiatives. He concludes that resources should be more evenly allocated between prevention initiatives encouraging behavioral change and initiatives that distribute condoms. Countries of interest include Uganda, Senegal, and Jamaica. Green...
  • January 1, 2001
    This report is the product of the All Africa Anglican Conference, held in August 13-16, 2001, in Cape Town. It serves as a guide that outlines an HIV/AIDS counteraction plan for the Anglican Communion. The plan includes measures that address prevention, pastoral care, counseling, HIV care, and treating the dying and dead with dignity. It also emphasizes the need for education, training, and effective leadership in order to diminish the stigma surrounding those affected by HIV/AIDS and their...
  • November 30, 2000
    MAP International provides a course of study for theological colleges and religious organizations in Africa to better address and combat the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The program originated in June 2000 with conversations among deans, principals, theologians, and representatives from twenty theological institutions from fourteen countries in east and southern Africa. In July 2001, the first draft of the curriculum was implemented; curricular development was supported by the World Council of...
  • September 8, 2000
    In July 1997, the Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le Sida and the association Ensemble Contre le Sida sponsored a study of a rural community in central Senegal to analyze the impact of religiosity on key factors related to HIV/AIDS and identified differing attitudes toward AIDS based on gender and religious connection. It found that religious men were less likely to cite AIDS as a major health problem, and religious women were much more likely to feel at risk than their non-religious...
  • October 1, 1998
    "AIDS Education Through Imams: A Spiritually-Motivated Community Effort in Uganda," published by UNAID, documents the experiences and findings of the Islamic Medical Association of Uganda (IMAU)'s HIV/AIDS education project in Uganda. It details the networks they establish with local religious leaders and volunteers to bring accurate information on HIV/AIDS to Muslim communities, along with the counseling and support services they offer to over 10,000 people in 11 districts. The report...
  • In this booklet, Christian Aid assesses the challenges facing African churches in their fight to stop the HIV/AIDS pandemic and explores ways for churches and individuals in the United Kingdom to assist them in their mission. It describes in detail what the HIV/AIDS pandemic looks like in Africa, summarizes the salient obstacles for churches, and highlights the problem of orphans. The discussion then shifts towards action, detailing unsuccessful behavioral changes, reasons for hope, and steps...
  • Catholic Relief Services (CRS), an organization that coordinates relief and development efforts in over 100 countries, has translated its experience into reports, case studies, and guidelines, which it makes available online. The Resource Page provides information on topics ranging from agriculture and education to water sanitation and microfinance. The page emphasizes resources for peacebuilding and combating HIV/AIDS, and more general tools for program implementation and development. The...
  • The Ecumenical Advocacy Alliance represents a global network of churches and faith-inspired organizations who work to fight injustice and assaults on human dignity. The EAA's online Resource Library includes information and documents issues like global trade, HIV/AIDS, and conflict resolution, in formats ranging from news articles and reports to speech transcripts and press releases. Users can search for resources through simple keywords, by related event or subject, by format, or by...
  • The report "Engaging with The Global Fund To Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria: A Primer For Faith-based Organizations" is designed to help faith-based organizations successfully apply for Global Fund grants and generally improve understanding and cooperation between FBOs and other stakeholders. It first provides a general overview of the Global Fund's history and structure, followed by examples of the diverse ways and levels at which FBOs can engage the Global Fund; it concludes with more...
  • In this pamphlet, Expanded Church Response (ECR) outlines its ECR Trust, a network of Protestant churches responding to HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria in Zambia. ECR seeks to provide moral guidance for the country, to respond to the biblical mandate to help the vulnerable, to coordinate and develop human capital that could be used for volunteerism, to effectively use physical assets around the country, and to facilitate collaboration of other faith-based organizations with similar...
  • The Micah Network unites over 300 Christian relief, development, and justice organizations from across the globe. The organization's website offers resources on the intersection of development and disability, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and community development best practices. The Integral Mission Resource Library offers congregations and church partners a variety of resources intentionally gathered from different regions of the world and ranging from theological papers to worship resources,...
  • In this paper, Dick Cremins, S.J., outlines a plan to promote the "A&B" method among non-faith-based AIDS-prevention organizations in Africa at a symposium hosted by the Pan-African Christian AIDS Network (PACANet). He details the effectiveness of "A&B" (“Abstain” and “Be faithful”) in comparison to “C” ("Condoms"), the primary difference between the Catholic strategy in fighting HIV/AIDS and that of secular and/or non-Catholic organizations. He points out that in order to effectively win out...