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Anne Barton-Veenkant

Anne Barton-Veenkant participated in the Berkley Center’s Junior Year Abroad Network from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in the spring of 2007. She graduated in 2008 with an individualized major in Interdisciplinary Studies: Human Development as the Complete Life, incorporating Government, Philosophy, and Health Studies.

Anne Barton-Veenkant on Religion and Divides in Brazilian Society

June 29, 2007

Religion in Brazil, as in every other place on Earth, plays a central role in shaping the morals and ideals of society, but what we often forget is that the relationship is reciprocal, and that religion itself can also be formed by the characteristics of society.

Anne Barton-Veenkant on the Unorthodoxy of Religion in Brazil

February 16, 2007

Clear divisions and explanations don’t come easy for Brazilian society. There are no clear lines between race, cultural background, or religion. Brazil is a country that has seen an integration of African culture, Portuguese as well as later European cultures, and indigenous cultures in a way that has created something new. It is no longer a mix of other cultures. It is Brazilian culture, completely singular in this world. It is perhaps because of this unique fusion that I have yet to read any work that sheds much light on religion in Brazil beyond the bare facts. Religion in Brazil defies any explanation. It cannot be put in a nice neat box.