Berkley Center Knowledge Resources Home Berkley Center Home Berkley Center on iTunes U Berkley Center's YouTube Channel Berkley Center's Vimeo Channel Berkley Center's YouTube Channel Berkley Center's iTunes Page Berkley Center's Twitter Page Berkley Center's Facebook Page Berkley Center's Vimeo Channel Berkley Center's YouTube Channel Berkley Center's iTunes Page WFDD's Twitter Page WFDD's Facebook Page Doyle Undergraduate Initiatives Undergraduate Learning and Interreligious Understanding Survey Junior Year Abroad Network Undergraduate Fellows Knowledge Resources KR Classroom Resources KR Countries KR Traditions KR Topics Berkley Center Home Berkley Center Knowledge Resources Berkley Center Home Berkley Center Forum Back to the Berkley Center World Faiths Development Dialogue Back to the Berkley Center Religious Freedom Project Back to the Berkley Center Religious Freedom Project Blog Back to the Berkley Center Catholic Social Thought Back to the Berkley Center Normative Orders Collaborative
August 1, 2014  |  About the Berkley Center  |  Directions to the Center  |  Subscribe
 
Programs People Publications Events For Students Resources Religious Freedom Project WFDD

Emily Liner

Emily Liner, from Bay Saint Louis, Mississippi, graduated from Georgetown in 2007 with a major in Government and minors in History and French. She participated in the Berkley Center’s Junior Year Abroad Network from Lyon, France during the spring of 2007.

Emily Liner on Catholicism and Islam in France

May 28, 2007

I had a hard time thinking of a topic for this letter, because I didn’t want to revisit Catholicism or Islam in France.  But there’s no avoiding them.  For one thing, there really aren’t many other large religions in France.  According to the CIA World Factbook, 83-88 percent of the French are Catholic, 5-10 percent are Muslim, 2 percent Protestant, and 1 percent Jewish. 

Emily Liner on the Dwindling Numbers of Practicing Catholics in France

March 1, 2007

In the random draw for a host family in Lyon, France, I was given a very devout Catholic family with four grown children and one still at home. My host mother, who teaches catechism in a private elementary school part-time, often laments the decline of the Catholic Church. Historically, the Catholic Church has been strong in France, but in the 20th century, participation has dropped precipitously. Fewer French citizens consider themselves Catholic, fewer French Catholics practice their religion, and fewer men are entering the priesthood. About 77 percent of the French population has received a Catholic baptism, but only about half of the country’s citizens actually consider themselves Catholic. In contrast, about a quarter of the American population describes itself as Catholic. Furthermore, in France, only eight percent of Catholics attend Mass once a week.