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Justin Hawkins

Justin Hawkins, a native of Breinigsville, PA, graduated from Georgetown in 2011 with a major in Government and minors in Theology and Spanish. He participated in the Berkley Center’s Junior Year Abroad Network from Salamanca, Spain during the 2009-2010 academic year.

Justin Hawkins on Piety and Syncretism in Northwest Spain

October 21, 2009

Galicia, the northwestern province of Spain, is home to the third holiest city in Christendom. After Rome and Jerusalem, Santiago de Compostela has profound religious significance as a vibrant center of religious piety due to its long and unique religious history reaching back almost two millennia. The earliest manifestation of Galicia’s religious history was a widely-believed folk mythology, the echoes of which are still noticeable in the daily religious life in the region. Nowhere else in Spain is the syncretic mix of antiquated folk mythology and traditional Orthodox Christianity so strong as in Galicia.

Justin Hawkins on Reactionary Protestantism in the Face of Monopolistic Catholicism

February 22, 2010

In a country as religiously homogenous as Spain where 94% of the population self-report as Catholic, religious minorities are not be able to survive without adapting certain characteristics of exclusion and cohesion that would not be necessary in a country with more equally-distributed religious diversity. The smaller numbers of believers and widespread opposition from other religions presents a situation which entrenches community loyalty and cements cohesion in that community. Consequently, it is possible to speak generally of the minority religion in terms of a monolithic unit because diversity of opinion and factionalism rarely exist within a community that is faced with such staunch opposition from without.