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RELATED PROJECT

RELATED ISSUE

Where do young people come down on questions of faith, values, and public life? How do they relate their values to public policy issues including education, economic inequality, and the environment? These questions, critically important for the 2012 election, are at the center of a campus conversation being organized by the Berkley Center and Georgetown University. This blog features an ongoing conversation about these issues between students selected as Millennial Values Fellows through a national competition. You can read and comment on their blogs here.

To learn more about the project, visit the Campus Conversation on Values page.

OTHER POSTS

Millennials on Social Media and Politics

November 15, 2012

Millennials on Social Issues and Diversity

November 12, 2012

Hira Baig (Rice) on Why the Presidential Election Matters to Millennials

November 7, 2012

Millennials on Religion and Interfaith Work

November 7, 2012

Ryan Price (Drake) on E Pluribus Duo

November 6, 2012

Mohammad Usman (DePauw) on Unpredictable Millennials

November 5, 2012

Millennials on Affirmative Action Policy

November 3, 2012

Seth Warner (Vassar) on What Happens as the "God Gap" Widens

November 2, 2012

Josina De Raadt (Dordt) on How Social Media Is Like Wii Bowling

October 31, 2012

Zachary Yentzer (Arizona State) on the Next Greatest Generation

October 29, 2012

Brice Ezell (George Fox) on Post-Racial America? Race, Millennials, and the 2012 Election

October 25, 2012

Tyler Bishop (Vanderbilt) on a Future of Hashtags #whatitmeansforus

October 23, 2012

Brice Ezell (George Fox) on How the People Can Heal a “Divided,” Partisan Nation

October 4, 2012

Hira Baig (Rice) on Religion and American Democracy

October 4, 2012

Tyler Bishop (Vanderbilt) on How It’s All About Relatability: Voter Turnout

October 3, 2012

Josina De Raadt (Dordt) on Mistaking Politics for a Hollywood Blockbuster

October 2, 2012

Mohammad Usman (DePauw) on the Internet Solution

October 1, 2012


>> more

RELATED RESOURCES: VALUES

World Values Survey
Organization

Jessie Hernandez (UC Berkeley) on American Values

Americanvalues

March 27, 2012

Contemporary Americans possess an obsession with social privilege, power, and a fear of centralized authority. Our voice and participation in public affairs illustrates a symbolism that reflects our cultural values and biases. Nonetheless, our value of conspicuous consumption and desire for social status represents a modern shift towards cultural individualism—a perceived necessity demanded in order to integrate into American society.
In turn, Americans emphasize importance on searching for legitimate sources that provide us with social, political, economic, and cultural authority. However, such behavior develops social inequities regardless of our struggles to see each other as equals and partners under Constitutional law. The result is that Americans today face conflicts with regard to sharing authority and power, and thus being able to work together to achieve shared goals. Instead, members of the citizenry persistently attack one another and seek to discharge the legitimacy of those who demonstrate different values and beliefs. As a result, we fail to unite on a shared set of values. Our behavior de-legitimizes the political process that permits us to govern ourselves—social democratic participation.

In the past, our social foundations have shaped our culture and the gridlock and failure to work toward common goals and actual compromise. Yet, reform is necessary. To improve, we must shift towards modernity and become conscious of our overt value for social status and materialism as requirements for recognition in American society. Awareness of our social expectations and the acceptance of values of equity and inclusion in America are important to us to us because they will provide the context to change our behavior, values, and reasoning in American society.

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values