What's So Funny About Peace, Love, and Christianity?

The year 2013 witnessed two of the strongest and funniest books about Christian belief in recent memory. Francis Spufford's Unapologetic is a frank account of “why, despite everything, Christianity can still make surprising emotional sense.” In his memoir The Dark Path, David Schickler chronicles his Catholic experience from parochial school wit to acclaimed writer—with a stop at Georgetown in between. The two authors sat down with Paul Elie to discuss their new books and the role that humor can play in giving an account of one's spiritual journey.
ABOUT THE BOOKS

Francis Spufford's Unapologetic is just that: a frank, rangy, note-perfect, to-thine-own-self-be-true (and to the Gospels, too, be true) account of “why, despite everything, Christianity can still make surprising emotional sense.” Sense it does make in this brilliant and electrically well-written book. Spufford comes to Georgetown from England, where he teaches writing at Goldsmiths College, Cambridge.

The “dark path” David Schickler has taken through Catholic experience led him from Rochester, New York, where he won the religion prize at his parochial school, to Rochester, New York, where he is now an acclaimed long-form-cable screenwriter and the author of bestselling comic fiction. Along the way, that dark path brought him to Georgetown (where he was an undergraduate) and through the Jesuit experience on the Hilltop—a story he tells poignantly, and uproariously, too, in his exceptional memoir The Dark Path.

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