2016 Education and Social Justice Project Presentations

During its seventh year, the Education and Social Justice Project awarded summer fellowships to five students who spent three weeks with institutions engaged in efforts to promote social justice through education in Rwanda, Jordan, Kenya, Slovenia, and Mexico. The 2016 fellows presented their research findings and experiences abroad before answering questions from interested applicants for the upcoming year.

Mariam Diefallah worked in Rwanda and discovered that education is a viable method to heal the social and psychological challenges associated with transgenerational trauma. Mariam's research revealed that Jesuit education enables students to create a positive identity and helps with the reconciliation process. Jonathan Thrall focused his research on the Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS) in Jordan. After investigating the multiple forms of discrimination that refugees in Jordan encounter, Jonathan argued that JRS plays an integral role in community building and engendering inclusivity and diversity during and after the refugee resettlement process. Khaliyah Legette conducted interviews and research in Kenya. Her research revealed that three separate programs established by Father Angelo D’Agostino, S.J., which focus on holistic healing for children with HIV/AIDS, enhance these children's abilities to navigate Kenyan social dynamics. Sarah Jannarone examined the only Jesuit-run residential college in Slovenia. She argued that their Magis program offers services to students that integrate academic, spiritual, and personal formation, including professional growth opportunities, thereby educating the whole person through informal education programs. Finally, Carolyn Vilter spent three weeks conducting research in Mexico City to understand how different stakeholders view and address the challenges associated with Central American migration through Mexico.

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